Lydia Souther

F, b. 22 June 1752, d. 17 November 1754
     Lydia Souther was born on 22 June 1752 at Hingham, Massachusetts.1,2 She was the daughter of Joseph Souther IV and Abigail Kent. Lydia Souther died on 8 November 1754 at Hingham, Massachusetts, at age 2.3 She died on 17 November 1754 at Hingham, Massachusetts, at age 2.4,5,1 She was buried at Beechwood Cemetery, Cohasset, Massachusetts.6 She died on 7 November 1757 at Cohasset, Massachusetts, at age 5.7 Lydia's small slate head and foot stones were transcribed on 3 Jul 2000 at Beechwood Cemetery in Cohasset. Her stones are slightly up the hill from her parents and youngest brother Elijah's stones. They read:

Headstone:
Lydia Souther
Daughter of Mr.
Joseph & Mrs.
Abigail Souther
Who Died Nouember
Ye __D 1754 Aged
2 Years & 5
Months & 11 Days


Footstone:
Lydia
Souther


The stone was difficult to decifer but here is the vitals from the manuscript collection at the New England Historic Genealogical Society which gives her death as 17 Nov 1754. "Souther, Lydia died Nov. 17, 1754 aged 2 y'rs 5 m's 11 ds. child of Mr. Joseph & Mrs. Abigail Souther."4 She was described on 21 August 2011 at 75283538.

Citations

  1. [S1] George Lincoln, Hingham-Genealogies, 3:157.
  2. [S75] Lloyd Vernon Briggs, Kent 1, p. 22.
  3. [S765] HD (1724-1781).
  4. [S1072] Newenglandancestors.org, "Cemetery Transcriptions from the NEHGS Manuscript Collections."
  5. [S307] TI, (Beechwood Cemetery - read on 3 July 2000 - both head stone and foot stone of slate).
  6. [S1116] Americanancestors.org, Cemetery Transcriptions from the NEHGS Manuscript Collections. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2002.).
  7. [S139] Thomas W. Baldwin, VR-Cohasset-1850, p. 226.

John Souther

M, b. 13 February 1755, d. 19 August 1807
John Souther house "Shipcote"
Built in 1792 - Colonial
31 Ship Street, Hingham, Massachusetts
"Revolutionary War - Privateer"
From the collection of: Richard Dennis Souther
     John Souther was Shipwright. He was born on 13 February 1755 at Hingham, Massachusetts.1,2,3 He was the son of Joseph Souther IV and Abigail Kent. John Souther married Deborah Leavitt, daughter of Joshua Leavitt and Deborah Fearing, on 21 December 1780 at Hingham, Massachusetts.4,5 John Souther appeared on the census of 1790 at Hingham, Massachusetts.6 He died on 19 August 1807 at Hingham, Massachusetts, at age 52.7 His estate was probated in 1807 at Plymouth County Probate #18898 - Will, Hingham, Massachusetts. John was a Private in the American Revolution along with his brothers Joseph and Daniel and his second cousin one time removed, Samuel Souther.

An excerpt from Quincy History by H. Hobart Holly, Issue #19, printed in the Fall of 1988. The article was titled "South Shore Maritime - A Brief History" with a sub-heading "South Shore Shipbuilders".

...."Hingham was a mackerel port with it's own Deputy Collector of Customs. The town's activity, including the shipbuilding and repair work centered on this fishing industry. Most of the vessels built were sloops and schooners for the local trade. Supplementing the shipyards were blockmakers, sailmakers, coopers, bucketmakers, a rope works and ship blacksmiths. The most important yard was at the foot of Ship Street. Francis Barker operated here from 1750 to 1792 when it was taken over by John Souther who, followed by his son Leavitt, operated the yard until the mid-1800's. There are records of 59 vessels built there including 4 ships, 2 barks and 22 brigs."....

The following is a list of vessels built by John Souther at the Souther Shipyard located at the foot of Ship Street in Hingham.

VESSEL      DATE      TYPE      WEIGHT
Cyprus       ???? Schooner 91
Chatham 1787 Schooner 65
America 1789 Schooner 65
Lincoln 1793 Sloop 29
Fair Play 1794 Sloop 32
Union 1797 Sloop 68
Polly 1798 Schooner 58
Ann Jane 1800 Brig 109
Alert 1801 Schooner 95
Friendship 1801 Sloop 36
UNION 1801 Sloop 43
EAGLE 1803 Schooner 88
HARMONY 1803 Schooner 32
TOM 1804 Schooner 101
ADVENTURE 1805 Schooner 106
EAGLE 1805 Schooner 79
ENTERPRISE 1805 Schooner 129
AMERICA 1806 Brig 192
ADAMANT 1807 Brig 184
TEXEL 1816 Brig 275
GEORGE 1818 Schooner 111
ARISTIDES 1820 Brig 291
MAGNET 1821 Brig 209
LINCOLN 1822 Brig 211
BELLE SAVAGE 1823 Sloop 35
RIO 1824 Brig 243
MARCELLA 1828 Brig 285
HERO 1836 Sloop 44
Total: 28 3,306




It was indicated by Margaret (Souther) Stanley in a letter to Ruth Elizabeth (Souther) Torrey in Feb 1992, that this John Souther "was an instigator and was put in prison for being and taking part in the Boston Tea Party". She had remembered seeing a newspaper article about it years ago.

John built 4 houses on the corners of Ship (formerly Fish) and Cottage Streets. He made his home at 31 Ship Street. The current owners of the home, Donald Robert and Grace Lettis have been living in the home since 1967 and were kind enough to share with me some historical background about the home and the Souther family.
The John Souther House
31 Ship Street


"This pleasant Colonial house facing on Hingham Harbor was built in 1792 by John Souther. Captain Francis Barker of the Old Ordinary owned a large amount of land around here and operated a shipyard in the marsh below from several small buildings situated where the house now is. He sold it all to Souther in 1791 for £118. Souther was a privateer in the Revolutionary War. He was captured by the British and held on a prison ship in New York harbor where he contracted small pox and the itch!"

Souther's son, John L. Souther, moved the shipyard to Quincy in 1815 but the family retained the home. In the 1840's and 1850's Leavitt Souther sold parts of the property at auction but the house remained in the family until 1888. At that time it was acquired by George Wright. (George Wright married 2nd to Emma Maria Souther and third to Sarah Ann Souther, both daughters of Leavitt Souther). In 1924 Elizabeth Coatsworth bought the property and she and her husband, Henry Beston, both well known authors, lived there until the 1940's when they gradually began to spend all their time in Maine. The house was rented to many tenants until Donald & Grace Lettis bought it from the Coatsworth estate in 1983.

Elizabeth Coatsworth named the house "Shipcote" and she wrote lovingly of it in her book South Shore Town. She had renovated it in 1926. The fireplace then in the old kitchen (now the living room) was removed to reveal the original one with its beehive oven and the maps on the wall above it were probably installed at that time. Also then the wallpaper with peacocks was hung in the dining room. The panels in the front parlor came from China.

Ms. Coatsworth had her desk in the southwest corner of the living room and one may see the hole where she had a speaking tube to communicate with the kitchen. In the front hall is a spyglass and a knife, said to have belonged to the privateer, which are to stay with the house.

Mr. and Mrs. Lettis have been living here since 1967 but they were only able to buy the house in 1983. They installed the new kitchen and they have been lovingly and carefully restoring the entire house.

"Each house has its personality, and some are hard and even wicked and some are kind. When I first walked through Shipcote and saw it wide, low rooms, its ample fireplaces in their paneled walls, and how the sun flooded into all its southern windows, and the bay stretched before all its northern windows, I thought, "What a gentle house in which to live and die." And that is still my thought after many years of rather intermittent living in it. The eighteenth century built houses for human beings, fitted to the spirit, as no other century even succeeded in doing. Spacious, clear, and untroubled are all the lines; even proportion is naturally right. Some people say that in America one reason for this is that the local builders got their plans from drawings made by eminent British architect, but the cause is deeper than that. Man must have reached some felicitous equilibrium in himself during that century, which is reflected in everything which his hand touched."
The Parlor



When baseboard heat was installed in this room we discovered stenciling under a large board used to support the old radiator. So the parlor, the "best" room of this old house, had a stenciled floor as well as dentilation along the ceiling and on the mantel. Elizabeth Coatsworth placed the eighteenth century Chinese scrolls on the walls. She had purchased them on her trip to China during the first World War. It was called the Music Room by the former owners.
The Kitchen


We discovered several things when renovating the 1925 kitchen. First, the ell had originally been a one story shed. We found this out when the siding was removed. At some point in time a second story had been added and these newly created rooms were used as servant's quarters. Before the ell became the kitchen it was the woodshed and household laundry. By the west wall, under the large screw eye in the ceiling, was the well. It has since been filled in but provided drinking and cooking water for the house. Water for washing clothes came from another source. We discovered in the basement a large bottle-shaped cistern built into the wall and located under the present sink. On the south wall is "...a great copper pot set in soapstone, with a copper lid and a place for building a fire beneath it, where clothes must once have been boiled and soap made by the women of the household."

We found that the wall between the kitchen and the living room had bricks set within the structure of the posts. The Red Lion Inn in Cohasset has the same type of construction. This clay brick construction was for the purpose of insulation and gives us another clue that the shed had been set against an outside wall after the original structure had been built.

In modernizing the kitchen we retained most of the original character of the room. The old woodbox, the configuration of the pantry and the washtub were saved. The enclosed stairway was opened and the solid door used for the closet. The grillwork for the new stairs was modeled after the bar cage at the "Old Ordinary", adding light and size to that part of the room.

The blue pie safe in the corner came from my grandmother's farm in the town of New Lisban, Otsego County, New York. Many of the old family pieces in the house came from the same source.
The Living Room


The living room was the original kitchen and keeping room of Shipcote. At each end were birthing rooms which shared the heat from the large fireplace. The beehive oven and the present fireplace were constructions of the 1920's, when the house was extensively renovated. The original fireplace must have been more extensive and utilitarian than the present facility to accommodate kitchen tasks of the time. The old map of the world and the bookcases were installed during this reconstruction.
Elizabeth Coatsworth used this room for her workroom. Her desk was located at the far end (southwest corner). A picture of her working at her "butler's desk" hangs on the wall in that corner. Just above the wainscot is located the hole into which fitted a speaking tube to the kitchen, used to talk with her maid/cook, Lalitha.
The Front Hall


The focus of the hall is John Souther's telescope holder. While the holder is original, the old telescope has been replaced by another. The sailor's knife is like those worn by privateers of the eighteenth and early nineteenth century, a profession the former owner is said to have participated in at that time.

The view from the front door has changed little in two hundred years. Gone is the Souther Shipyard below the road, but Sarah, Langly, Ragged and Button Islands, as well as World's End look much the same.

We added the stenciling to this room and to two rooms upstairs. We used ideas from a pattern book of the 1790 to 1820 era to show what might have been had Moses Eaton, Jr.+ passed this way.
The East Bedroom


Before this room was renovated, Grace and I had visited Hancock Village just outside of Pittsfield, Massachusetts. We were so taken with the Shaker architecture and crafts that we decided that one room of our house had to reflect these simple things. A second influence, shown in the stenciling, was Shipcote's connection to the sea. "Patience - Faith - Openness, is what the sea has to teach. Simplicity - Solitude - Intermittency. . . But there are other beaches to explore. There are more shells to find. This is only a beginning." These words of Anne Morrow Lindbergn describe Shipcote for us. The shells and the Shaker character remind us of its openness and simplicity.
The South Bedroom


This room, which we use as a sitting room/guest bedroom, was divided into smaller rooms at one time. We found evidence of this while renovating which leads us to believe that this was once a rooming house in the early part of this century. Many old houses in this part of town were used for this purpose well into the 1930's.

The stenciling is a copy of a freeze found in the Franklin Pierce Homestead in Hillsboro, New Hampshire, done some time prior to 1822. This would be in keeping with the time Shipcote was built. The fireplace mantel appears to be one of two original in the house. The other is in the east bedroom.
The West Bedroom


"...One may look...straight out across elm branches to the changing harbor and note every tide and wind and visitation of passing birds, or lie listening to the mournful mooing of the fog horn..."*+ It is this room, her bed changer, that Elizabeth Coatsworth writes in South Shore Town. Bedtime stories were told to her children and Christmas gifts were opened here on a large, curtained four-poster bed. The story she tells about sighting a swan from this window is delightful.

"At the end of June Margaret was born, and sometime in July I was back in my own room, looking out over the harbor. That day the baby was with me asleep. The house was quiet with the drowsy quiet of summer. Glancing idly from my front windows, I suddenly stiffened a the sight of a large white bird floating in the inlet in the lea of Goose Neck. This lies just below our house, a long stone's throw from where I stood in the peaceful chamber looking out. I could scarcely trust my eyes, but I knew that the bird was a swan, feeding so close to shore that its great breast must almost have been grounded in the shallows. There is a pond on the Cape called Swan Pond, and people sometimes report a distant flight of swans seen from the beaches far offshore, but never have I met anyone who has come upon a wild swan in these parts. But here the creature was, as tranquil as the reflection of a cloud. Here it was in midsummer curving its lovely throat, floating here and there, pausing, darting down its proud head into the water.

After a time I called Lalitha, who came up from the kitchen. I not only wanted her to see this marvel, but I wish evidence beside my own to prove that I had really seen what I though I had seen. 'What is that?' I asked. And Lalitha looked and said, 'That's sure a swan, Miss Betty.'

And then she returned to the more absorbing interests of her kitchen. But the baby and I remained watching the swan - not that the baby's kitten-blue eyes could really see that far, but I picked her up to look out, for somehow the swan belonged to her. For an hour I gazed dreamily forth upon that dream. A unicorn pacing down Otis Street would have scarcely seemed more visionary. And at the end of an hour, the swan turned from its shallows and slowly, tranquilly floated away. Between Sarah and Langley Islands I could still see it like a white water lily on the blue bay, and far out almost to Hull I caught glimpses of it like a star which appears and disappears in the blue sky of dawn. Then it was gone, the vision was gone, and from that day to this I have never seen it again"

+     An itinerant Stenciler who worked in New Hampshire and Maine in the early part of the Nineteenth century. Several of his stencil motifs are incorporated here and in the rooms upstairs.8,9

Children of John Souther and Deborah Leavitt

Citations

  1. [S1] George Lincoln, Hingham-Genealogies, 3:157.
  2. [S72] Mathilda Cecilia Giauque Steed, Leavitts, p. 69.
  3. [S75] Lloyd Vernon Briggs, Kent 1, p. 22.
  4. [S1116] Americanancestors.org, Vital Records of Hingham, Massachusetts, ca. 1639-1844. (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2006. Vital Records of Hingham, Massachusetts, ca. 1639-1844. Hersey, Reuben. Mss 901. R. Stanton Avery Special Collections Department, New England Historic Genealogical Society.) 1:281.
  5. [S1] George Lincoln, Hingham-Genealogies, p. 157.
  6. [S1039] 1790-MA, Town of Hull, p. 201.
  7. [S253] Hingham Town Clerk, VR-Hingham-Fische, Deaths, 2:257:#.
  8. [S135] Elizabeth Coatsworth, SST, pp. 11, 13-14, 26.
  9. [S1120] Anne (Morrow) Lindbergh, Gift from the Sea, p. 128.

Asa Souter

M, b. 22 July 1760, d. 25 September 1799
     Asa Souter was Cooper. He was born on 22 February 1760 at Cohasset, Massachusetts.1 He was born on 22 July 1760 at Hingham, Massachusetts.2 He was the son of Joseph Souther IV and Abigail Kent. Asa Souter was also known as Souther. He married first to Meriel Tower, daughter of Job Tower and Mary Pratt, on 21 August 1783 at Cohasset, Massachusetts.3,4,5 Asa Souter appeared on the census of 1790 at Cohasset, Massachusetts.6 He married Sarah Whiton, daughter of Ezekiel Whiton and Olive Stodder, on 29 January 1795 at Cohasset, Massachusetts. Asa Souter married second to Sarah Whiton, daughter of Ezekiel Whiton and Olive Stodder, on 29 November 1795 at Cohasset, Massachusetts.3,7 Asa Souter died on 25 September 1799 at Cohasset, Massachusetts, at age 39.8,9 Asa was a soldier of the Revolution and died of wounds received in action. His family lived on King Street (Sohier Street).

The Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolutionary War: A Compilation from the Archives, prepared and published by the Secretary of the Commonwealth in accordance with Chapter 100, Resolves of 1891, (Wright & Potter Printing Co., State Printers, Boston, 1906), in custody of the Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Honolulu, O`ahu, Hawai`i, lists Asa as being 20 years old. He may have lied about his age in order to enlist on 5 Feb 1777. It further lists him with a stature of 5'9", dark complexion, dark hair, and occupation, cooper.

Asa received bounty land (100 acres) 27 Feb 1790, Warrant No. 4972 & 13949.

Children of Asa Souter and Meriel Tower

Children of Asa Souter and Sarah Whiton

Citations

  1. [S139] Thomas W. Baldwin, VR-Cohasset-1850, p. 96.
  2. [S253] Hingham Town Clerk, VR-Hingham-Fische, Births, 2:108:#.
  3. [S139] Thomas W. Baldwin, VR-Cohasset-1850, p. 169.
  4. [S86] Charlemagne Tower, Tower, p. 161.
  5. [S75] Lloyd Vernon Briggs, Kent 1, p. 22.
  6. [S1039] 1790-MA, Town of Cohasset, p. 165.
  7. [S225] Richard Warren Souther Jr, RWSJr.
  8. [S139] Thomas W. Baldwin, VR-Cohasset-1850, p. 226.
  9. [S136] Louis Cushing Souther, LCS.

Laban Souther

M, b. 9 November 1762, d. 19 December 1840
Laban Souther house, built circa 1782
211 River Street, Norwell, Massachusetts
From the collection of: Richard Dennis Souther
     Laban Souther was Master Carpenter. He was christened on 9 November 1762 at Hingham, Massachusetts. He was born on 9 November 1762 at Hingham, Massachusetts.1,2 He was the son of Joseph Souther IV and Abigail Kent. Laban Souther married first to Martha Marble before 1782 at Cohasset, Massachusetts.3 Laban Souther married second to Betsey Randall, daughter of Samuel Randall and Sarah Clapp, on 15 December 1783 at Scituate, Massachusetts.4,5 Laban Souther married Betsey Randall, daughter of Samuel Randall and Sarah Clapp, on 25 December 1783 at Scituate, Massachusetts.6,7 Laban Souther died on 19 December 1840 at South Scituate, Massachusetts, at age 78.8,9,10 He was buried at First Parish Cemetery, Norwell, Massachusetts. His estate was probated in 1841 at Plymouth County Probate #18900 - Will, Scituate, Massachusetts. The following information has been extracted from History of Shipbuilding on North River, Plymouth County, Massachusetts 1640-1872 by Lloyd Vernon Briggs, (Coburn Brothers Printers, Boston, 1889), pp. 243-267.

Laban lived just north of the gate on the road leading to the residence of Samuel C. Cudworth, Esq. He was the uncle of Elijah Cudworth, son of Captain Joseph Cudworth and Elizabeth Souther. Souther & Cudworth Shipyard was located on the banks of the North River in Scituate. The partnership of Laban Souther and Elijah Cudworth was particularly pleasant and was only terminated by the death of Mr. Souther in 1840.

Laban laid the keel of the Schooner President, 85 tons, on 9 May 1816 and she was launched 29 Mar 1817. The firm procured timber from the vicinity at first, the forests then yielding plentifully white and black oak and other timber suitable for shipbuilding. In after years it was procured from the forests of Bridgewater and Abington, at much greater cost, part of which was for transportation.

In 1818 the Schooner Pharamond, 84 tons, of Boston was built. The owners were Elijah Curtis, Laban Souther, Samuel Tolman and William James of Scituate and Lemuel Brackett of Quincy. The vessel was begun 10 Apr 1817 and launched 19 Mar 1818. It cost $175 to rig her and $96 for duck for the sails. It appears that this vessel was fully rigged at the yard and engaged in mackerel fishing for some years, making large returns for her owners. The last account of her was when she was sold to Boston merchants about 1821 and sailed on 22 May of that year from there. 1819 found them building the Schooner Seventh Son. The Schooner Three Sisters, was constructed in 1820. By 1822, "Seventh Son" could be found in the Atlantic whaling from Provincetown under a Captain Cook.

In 1822 the firm built a vessel which they named after Mr. Souther. The Laban, a Schooner of 87 tons out of Boston was built by owners in Scituate, Samuel Tolman, Jr., Elijah Cudworth and Laban Souther.

The following years find more ships being built by Souther & Cudworth, the Schooners William and Freedom in 1823, a Brigantine in 1824, Rice Plant, 122 tons of Boston, 1825 the Schooner Clarinda, 54 tons. In 1826, the ship Leonidas, 231 tons of Boston was also built in Scituate by Souther & Cudworth. She later sank off Charleston, South Carolina in 1861. She had been sold to her Captain Ellis of Boston for $6,201.10. An interesting note: When the Leonidas was being built, the towns people would come by and ask Laban Souther, who was somewhat of a stutterer, what the name of his vessel was going to be, to hear him say "Le-Le-Leonidas".

Working for the shipyard was hard work. You could find most of the workers there from sunrise to sunset.

During the next six years the Souther & Cudworth yard put out the following vessels: 1827, the Brigantine Malaga, 150 tons of Duxbury; 1828, the Schooner Louisa, 60 tons of Beverly; 1829, the Brigantine Hebe, 171 tons of Boston; 1830, the Schooner Maria, 64 tons of Cohasset. In 1831 they built the Bark Flora, 293 tons of Boston; 1832, the Schooner America, 81 tons of Boston; 1833, the Brigantine Josephine, 232 tons of Boston. Also in 1833, the Bark Nashua, 301 tons of Boston was built. This was quite a large vessel for the Souther & Cudworth yard. In 1834, they built the Schooner Louisa, 97 tons, for Captain Cook of Provincetown. It is believed that the Schooner President Washington, 49 tons was built in this yard for owners in Augusta, Maine.

The Schooner Tarquin, 101 tons of Provincetown was built here. She was built for a lumber carrier and was constructed with a low deck of mixed wood and iron fastened. Shortly before Laban's death, a few more vessels were constructed. In 1836, the Schooner Rebecca, 63 tons, oak, iron fastened; owned in 1859 by Captain Dill of Wellfleet. About the same time the Schooner Almira and the Brigantine Sea Moss were built. Three years later, the Schooner Susan Baker, 99 tons of Boston was built. The last vessel believed constructed at the Souther & Cudworth shipyard before Laban's death was the 198 ton Brigantine Souther built of oak, iron and copper fastened. (Some say it was built at Taylor's Yard, but others say that was another ship named Souther. The Souther was owned in 1859 by C. Sawyer of Gloucester under the command of Captain Tucker and in 1865 she hailed from a British port.

After Laban's death, the shipyard continued under the direction of Elijah Cudworth and his sons.

Laban also had an association with John Parker, (18 Sep 1795 - 26 Mar 1868), and engaged in the shipping business under the firm name of Souther & Parker.

The 23 Jan 1992 issue of The Hingham Journal sent to me by Scott Dennis Gordon listed some highlights of an 1832 issue of the same paper which read:

. . . . The new ship Souther is finally free of ice in the harbor. It has taken workmen several days to free the ship for passage. . . .

In regards to Laban's home, much information can be found in the 1976 publication of Historical Homesteads of Norwell, Volume IV.
The Laban Souther House



A photograph which James T. Williams took a century ago looking across the Wanton shipyard site from open fields in Marshfield shows several River Street houses standing along the distant skyline. On the ridge, a little downriver from the lane to the Wanton site, can be seen the house of Laban Souther, one of the river's most noted builders.

The largest room in this house today is the original kitchen across the back, now enlarged by including one of the two small end rooms, such as flank the kitchen at the center rear of most "Cape"-style houses which have a center chimney. A deep original inner oven of "bee hive" shape adds scale to a cavernous splayed fireplace which retains early beaded sheathing over the long mantel. At the foot of a straight flight of transverse stairs an original door of feather edge sheathing, its battens cleated with forged nails, opens in the boarded partition. Two skillfully adzed posts curving outward to either side at the top are prominent in this room.

All the boxed corner posts are generous sized. Hand planed two panel doors point to ship's carpenter construction and the scarf jointed sills confirm it.

This is another story and a half house without front stairs, there being a closet in front of the chimney instead. Both front rooms, to the left and right of the entrance way, have open fireplaces. There is reason to suspect that panelling remains covered on both of these fireplace walls.

The Souther house is of unstudded "post and beam" construction with vertical planking on exterior walls.

The first name associated with this house is Tower - Matthew. Tower, a grandson of Benjamin who came here in 1716 and is buried on the crest of the old cemetery at Church Hill. Laban Souther, famous long time occupant of the house, came from Cohasset and began work in 1807 at Foster's yard, then, starting in 1812 built at Chittenden after the Torrey's moved down to the Block House. As outlined above, he had a distinguished career in North River shipbuilding. Following his death on 19 Dec 1840 at the age of 78, he was buried in First Parish Cemetery.
Matthew Tower - Laban Souther House
Documentation


March 22, 1786 Samuel Curtis, blacksmith sold to Matthew Tower, shipwright, "3/4 of an acre of upland lying in said Scituate near Captain Hendersons', bounded beginning at a stake standing on the west side of the way leading to John Stetsons', thence with the way northerly 16 rods and 17 links, thence with the way westerly 1 rod and 11 links, thence southwest with the way (the town way, now River Street) 16 1/2 rods, then on a straight line to the first mentioned stake, with all the priviledges and appurtenances thereto belonging."

The house was built between 1786 and 1793 as on 5 Jun 1793, Matthew Tower sold to Laban Souther of Scituate, shipwright, the "3/4 of an acres of land with a dwelling house and barn thereon. "Matthew Tower, shipwright, would seem, therefore, to have built the house although he may not have occupied it, inasmuch as the deed includes no statement such as "where I now dwell."

Laban Souther sold to Anson Robbins his "lot containing about 3/4 of an acre with the house I now live in with other buildings thereon" 28 Jan 1840.

Laban died 19 Dec 1840. However, before he died, Laban Souther of Cohasset and Anson Robbins quit claimed to Rebecca Rose, singlewoman, (Laban's housekeeper) 3/4 of an acre with buildings the same land and buildings where the said Rebecca Rose now lives in," 13 Nov 1840.

Rebecca Rose, singlewoman, sold the 3/4 of an acre with buildings to Benjamin Litchfield seven years later.

Benjamin was a widower in 1857 and in April of 1863 contemplating remarriage, agreed to sell to Catherine A. Walsh for $1.00 and other considerations his homestead place which he now occupied that was formerly Laban Southers' deceased, reserving the use and improvement during his natural life if Catherine agreed to unite herself with him in marriage and to pay a certain mortgage.

This agreement was apparently carried out as in 1895 Fred Curtis, administrator to the estate of Catherine (Walsh) Kehoe, sold at public auction the Laban Souther house to Judson Bates.

Subsequent owners have been: the Damon, Locke, Blake, Baird, Millar, Ritchie and Vinal families.

The current owners/residents of the house of the noted Scituate shipbuilder, Laban Souther are Richard Manson and Ann Marie Boonisar and their son, Nathaniel M. Boonisar. The BoonisarS are very appreciative not only of the house but the shipyard traditions. Richard holds a special interest in ships, the Atlantic coastal history and its life saving institutions especially. He has been endowed through his mother's family with sufficient knowledge to give him wide recognition as an authority.

The Laban Souther home is located at 211 River Street, Norwell, Massachusetts.

After contacting Ann Boonisar she was kind enough to send me a copy of Laban Souther's inventory of his personal estate. (Some of the written words were difficult to interpret and because of some restrictions of line lengths, I have had to split some lines to two).

TO THE JUDGE OF PROBATE FOR THE COUNTY OF PLYMOUTH, AN INVENTORY of the Estate of Laban Souther late of Scituate in said County, Shipwright deceased, appraised under oath by the subscribers, duly appointed to that service by the Hon. Judge of Probate for said County.

REAL ESTATE      Dolls. Cents

Personal Estate
2 Cows           45           00
English & First xxxx      27           00
Corn fodder & Rye xxxx 1           00
M arcine x            4           00
Light wagon       5           00
250 feet inch boards       2           50
Horse cart            2           00
Wood            5           00
Woodsaw .50 Saddle .75 1           25
Horsecart Harness       1           50
Crowbar            1           00
Wagon Harness       3           00
2 barrels apples       1           00
1 lb cider            1           00
Tub & soap       1           50
Cxxx fxxx                50
5 bushels of rye       4           00
3 meal bags                50
10 bushels of potatoes 2           50
300 lbs pork           18           00
six bushels of apples       2           00
3 Meat tubs       2           00
50 lbs flour            1           25
65 lbs of cheese       5           85
Mortxx                25
10 lbs of butter       2           00
pan stutxxx                50
25 lbs of lard            2           50
knives & forks                33
Small Brass Kettle       1           00
Gun            1           00
3 Cranxx & hooks       2           00
Fine set                75
1 Brass Clock       15           00
2 Looking Glasses       2           00
7 Tea Spoons silver       1           25
one whip                25
4 Feather & 4 xxxx beds      20           00
50 lbs beef            2           50
15 bushels corn      10           00
2 bushels dry apples 2.       2           00
Pre? clothes           24           00
Table linen             2           00
Farming tools       5           00
Carpenters tools       1           50
Household Furniture      16       75
Tin & Pewter dishes & pans      4           33
Iron ware            3           25
Earthern ware       1           03
Wooden ware       1           25
sleigh bells                50
      $262           09
          
          
Laban and his wife are buried at First Parish Cemetery in Norwell, Massachusetts. Entering from the South entrance across the street from the church, their stone can be found on the right side; second and third ones in. Betsey or Betty Randall, daughter of Samuel Randall and Sarah Clapp was born in 1761 and died 9 Nov 1832 at South Scituate, Massachusetts. He was described on 26 July 2010 at 55485291.

Citations

  1. [S1] George Lincoln, Hingham-Genealogies, p. 157.
  2. [S75] Lloyd Vernon Briggs, Kent 1, p. 23.
  3. [S2] George Lyman & Elizabeth Osgood Davenport, Cohasset-Genealogies, p. 394 - The Vital Records of Cohasset to the year 1850 does not show this marriage.
  4. [S87] Hamilton Wilson Welch, HWW.
  5. [S208] Frederick W. Bailey, MA Marriages, II:181.
  6. [S170] VR-Scituate-1850, p. 262.
  7. [S643] Frank Alfred Randall, Randall, p. 111.
  8. [S41] Unknown author, Homesteads-Norwell, &.
  9. [S259] Charles M. Thatcher, Old Cemeteries, p. 183.
  10. [S537] VR-Pembroke-1850, p. 446.

Elijah Souther

M, b. 15 May 1766, d. 12 December 1785
     Elijah Souther was christened on 15 May 1766 at Hingham, Massachusetts. He was born on 15 May 1766 at Cohasset, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Joseph Souther IV and Abigail Kent. Elijah Souther was buried at Beechwood Cemetery, Cohasset, Massachusetts. He died on 12 December 1785 at Cohasset, Massachusetts, at age 19.2,3,4 Elijah's worn and lichen covered tombstone was discovered by Grace Mary "Dee Dee" Dunn on 2 Jul 2000. It is facing his grandfather's foot stone (Ebenezer Kent, (within 10" of each other on the slope of the old section of Beechwood Cemetery in Cohasset. It appears to be a Memorial Stone. The head stone inscriptions reads:
In Memory of
Elijah Souther son of Mr.
Joseph Souther &
Abigail his wife
he Died Dec.
12th __8_ [in the]
19th Year of
his AGE

The foot stone:

E. S.
1785.

He was described on 13 August 2011 at 74876166.

Citations

  1. [S75] Lloyd Vernon Briggs, Kent 1, p. 23.
  2. [S1116] Americanancestors.org, Cemetery Transcriptions from the NEHGS Manuscript Collections. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2002.).
  3. [S1] George Lincoln, Hingham-Genealogies, p. 157.
  4. [S307] TI, (Beechwood Cemetery - read on 3 July 2000 - the head stones year of death is difficult to read, but the foot stone also has the year and it is very clear).

Phyllis Marion Souther

F, b. 14 March 1909, d. 6 May 1970
     Phyllis Marion Souther was Cashier. She was born on 14 March 1909 at North Weymouth, Massachusetts.1 She was the daughter of Herbert Souther and Emma Gertrude Miller. Phyllis Marion Souther appeared on the census of 25 April 1910 at Pearl Street, Weymouth, Massachusetts.2 She appeared on the census of 1920 at Weymouth, Massachusetts.3 She married first to Emil John Lindholm, son of John Lindholm and Selma Tjernell, on 15 September 1927 at Quincy, Massachusetts.4 Her married name was Lindholm. Phyllis Marion Souther appeared on the census of 17 April 1930 at Pratt Avenue, Weymouth, Massachusetts.5 She married second to James Leslie Skene, son of John Skene and Ann Hall, on 5 April 1932 at Braintree, Massachusetts.6 Her married name was Skene. Phyllis Marion Souther died on 6 May 1970 at Lincoln Park, Wayne, Michigan, at age 61. She was buried at Lincoln Park, Wayne, Michigan.

Citations

  1. [S251] Town Clerks, MA-DOH-VR, Births, Volume 592, p. 128, #49.
  2. [S677] 1910-MA, ED 119; Sheet 14B, Line 78.
  3. [S817] 1920-MA, Roll T625-724, Enumeration District 277, p. 10A.
  4. [S251] Town Clerks, MA-DOH-VR, Marriages, 58:274:131.
  5. [S943] 1930-MA, ED 36; Sheet 12, Line 94.
  6. [S251] Town Clerks, MA-DOH-VR, Marriages, 60:57:32.

Louise Mabel Souther

F, b. 4 December 1914, d. 20 November 1998
Louise Mabel Souther
Pratt Avenue, Weymouth, MA
From the collection of:
      Louise Mabel Souther lived at 11130 Saucier Drive, Creve Coeur, Saint Louis, Saint Louis, Missouri. She was born on 4 December 1914 at North Weymouth, Massachusetts.1 She was the daughter of Herbert Souther and Emma Gertrude Miller. Louise Mabel Souther was also known as Babe Souther. She appeared on the census of 1920 at Weymouth, Massachusetts.2 She appeared on the census of 17 April 1930 at Pratt Avenue, Weymouth, Massachusetts.3 She married first to Raymond Rich Freeman Jr., son of Raymond Rich Freeman and Mary Ambrose Snow, on 9 October 1932 at Weymouth, Massachusetts.4 Her married name was Freeman. Louise Mabel Souther and Raymond Rich Freeman Jr. were divorced on 31 August 1965 at Massachusetts. Her married name was Burke. (an unknown value). Louise Mabel Souther died on 20 November 1998 at Saint Louis, Saint Louis, Missouri, at age 83. She was obituary BURKE, LOUISE M., November 20, 1998, loving wife of James J. Burke, beloved mother of Raymond R. Freeman and Joanne C. Rogers, dear grandmother of 6 and great-grandmother of 6, dear sister, aunt, cousin and friend to many.

Louise received her nurses training at Massachusetts General Hospital. She then went on to do post graduate work at Duke University Medical Center.

There will be a gathering of family and friends from 6-8 p.m., Mon., Nov. 23 at KRIEG-SHAUSER Mortuary-West Chapel (9450 Olive Blvd.). In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a charity of your choice. in November 1998 at Saint Louis, Saint Louis, Missouri. Louise was the baby of the family and her father always use to call her "Babe". That is how she came by her nickname. Mabel was the name of her mother's cousin.

Babe's first marriage was "with consent" of parents! She use to live in a trailer at Long Pond on Cape Cod. After she divorced Ray in 1965, she then married Jim, and they lived for a time in Durham, North Carolina before finally moving to Saint Louis, Missouri.

The following obituary and thoughts of Babe were provided by her husband, James Joseph Burke, Jr.

BURKE, LOUISE M., November 20, 1998, loving wife of James J. Burke, beloved mother of Raymond R. Freeman and Joanne C. Rogers, dear grandmother of 6 and great-grandmother of 6, dear sister, aunt, cousin and friend to many.

Louise received her nurses training at Massachusetts General Hospital. She then went on to do post graduate work at Duke University Medical Center.

There will be a gathering of family and friends from 6-8 p.m., Mon., Nov. 23 at Krieg-Shauser Mortuary-West Chapel (9450 Olive Boulevard). In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a charity of your choice.
_____

Louise was cremated.

Louise loved her family and friends, cats and dogs, flowers and birds. She was a great cook. We traveled the world, visiting all 50 states and about 85 foreign countries. She was an avid reader and crossword puzzle solver. We competed in rallies and speed events in sports cars and Louise won more trophies. We also played cards and backgammon and kept running tallies for decades. Louise was loved and admired by everyone. We all have wonderful memories of warmth, humor, spirit, and tenacity. She will be missed greatly.

Child of Louise Mabel Souther and Raymond Rich Freeman Jr.

Citations

  1. [S251] Town Clerks, MA-DOH-VR, Births, Volume 624, p. 133, #274.
  2. [S817] 1920-MA, Roll T625-724, Enumeration District 277, p. 10A.
  3. [S943] 1930-MA, ED 36; Sheet 12, Line 94.
  4. [S251] Town Clerks, MA-DOH-VR, Marriages, 60:157:132.

William Ames Anderson

M
     William Ames Anderson is the son of Frank Aubrey Anderson and Emma Francis Hoh.

Paul Michael Anderson

M
     Paul Michael Anderson is the son of William Ames Anderson and Barbara Louise Souther.

Gail Elizabeth Anderson

F
     Gail Elizabeth Anderson is the daughter of William Ames Anderson and Barbara Louise Souther.

Mark William Anderson

M
     Mark William Anderson is the son of William Ames Anderson and Barbara Louise Souther.

Lori Ann Marion Smolinsky

F
     Lori Ann Marion Smolinsky is the daughter of Lawrence Thomas Smolinsky and Anne Marie Katherine Meier.

Lynda Hanscom

F

Steven Paul Hanscom Anderson

M
     Steven Paul Hanscom Anderson is the son of Paul Michael Anderson and Lynda Hanscom.

Elizabeth Boden

F, b. circa 1677
     Elizabeth Boden was born circa 1677. She married Daniel Souther, son of Joseph Sowther [Immigrant Ancestor] and Elizabeth Fairfield, on 15 June 1697 at Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1,2 Her married name was Souther.

Child of Elizabeth Boden and Daniel Souther

Citations

  1. [S248] William S. Appleton, RC-B, Bt, M & D, p. 236.
  2. [S919] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants & Estates et al, Reference Code 6522.

Charles Woodart Perry

M, b. 5 January 1855, d. 1 April 1907
     Charles Woodart Perry was born on 5 January 1855 at Rockland, Maine.1,2 He was the son of William Perry and Lucinda Havener. Charles Woodart Perry appeared on the census of July 1870 at Ward 1, Rockland, Maine.3 He married first to Georgie Etta Cables, daughter of George H. Cables and Nancy H. Grant, on 5 April 1876 at Rockland, Maine.4 Charles Woodart Perry appeared on the census of 4 June 1880 at Rockland, Maine.5 He and Georgie Etta Cables were divorced in 1895.2 Charles Woodart Perry married second to Minnie A. Charles Woodart Perry died on 1 April 1907 at Acton, Massachusetts, at age 52.6,7 He was buried on 3 April 1907 at Seaview Cemetery, Rockland, Maine.7 Charles and Georgie were married in the family home by Reverend J. Killoch as reported by the Rockland Courier Gazette.

Charles owned property and ice houses at Chickawaukee Pond.

At the time of his death, Charles was a resident of Rockland, Maine. The informant for his death was a Minnie Perry. Charles and his wife are buried at Seaview Cemetery in Rockland, Maine.

A clue to the origins of the Perry family may be found in Brief Sketch of the Town of Vinalhaven, From its earliest known Settlement where it mentions a John Perry born in Duxbury, Massachusetts in 1741 removed to Vinalhaven in 1764. He was described on 6 September 2011 at 76087205.

Children of Charles Woodart Perry and Georgie Etta Cables

Citations

  1. [S758] Cyrus Eaton, Thomaston-Rockland, p. 355.
  2. [S883] Arlene Clare (Perry) Lemire, AC(P)L.
  3. [S1044] 1870-ME, Roll M593-548, p. 299.
  4. [S397] Charles Samuel Candage and Ruth Louis (Pitman) Candage, VR-Rockland, ME-1892, Marriages, 2:1165.
  5. [S846] 1880-ME, Film T9-482, ED 108, p. 107C.
  6. [S251] Town Clerks, MA-DOH-VR, Deaths, (Charles Woodart Perry), Volume 1, p. 114.
  7. [S1069] DC, for Charles Woodart Perry, Certificate #114 dated 5 Apr 1907.
  8. [S981] Ancestry.com, 1880 Federal Census for Rockland, Knox, Maine, (Roll T9-482, p. 107C).

Georgie Etta Cables

F, b. 24 October 1857, d. 21 February 1922
     Georgie Etta Cables was Practical Nursing. She was born on 24 October 1857 at Rockland, Maine.1,2 She was the daughter of George H. Cables and Nancy H. Grant. Georgie Etta Cables was also known as Georgietta Cables. Georgie Etta Cables was also known as Georgia E. Cables. She appeared on the census of 16 June 1860 at Rockland, Maine.3 She appeared on the census of 1870 at Rockland, Maine.4 She married Charles Woodart Perry, son of William Perry and Lucinda Havener, on 5 April 1876 at Rockland, Maine.5 Her married name was Perry. Georgie Etta Cables appeared on the census of 4 June 1880 at Rockland, Maine.6 She and Charles Woodart Perry were divorced in 1895.7 Georgie Etta Cables appeared on the census of 1 June 1900 at Camden Street (Ward 1), Rockland, Maine.1 She appeared on the census of 25 April 1910 at Carver Street, Ward 3, Rockland, Maine; [widow - residing with William T. and Martha A. Littlefield].8 She died on 21 February 1922 at Vinalhaven, Maine, at age 64.7 She was buried at Seaview Cemetery, Rockland, Maine.7 "Georgie was very active in the Littlefield Memorial Baptist Church in Rockland, Maine. She raised money to renovate the church by selling calendars. The church is still there. She took her religion seriously and was true to it all of her adult life. She divorced Charles W. Perry when he took to drinking excessivly and earned her own living by practical nursing and was in great demand according to my grandmother Agnes May (Perry) Radley (her daughter).

Georgie Etta died on the island of Vinal Haven of peritonitis. My grandmother told of having to go by boat and to cut the ice in the Rockland breakwater in order to get to her in time before she died. My grandmother made it in time to see her mother alive and told of her reciting the 23rd psalm before she died and how her feet were getting numb and when it got to [her] heart she would be gone. She had eaten a combination of foods known to upset here [sic] and paid with her life, peanuts, bananas and clams. Georgie had a history of problems with her bowel. I suspect she suffered from a form of diverticulitis".7 By the time the 1900 Federal Census for Maine was enumerated, Georgie was already divorced. She was recorded as the Head of the house, residing on Camden Street in Rockland. Along with her and her two daughters, Lucinda and Agnes, she had two boarders: Joseph M. Roach, a day laborer, born in Maine on Dec 1876 and Alfonso Rich, a photographer, born Aug 1877 in New York. Then in 1910, she was recorded as a widow, residing on Carver Street, Ward 3 at Vinalhaven as a border with William T. and Martha A. Littlefield.1 Georgie is buried in Seaview Cemetery in Rockland, Maine. She was described on 6 September 2011 at 76087449.

Children of Georgie Etta Cables and Charles Woodart Perry

Citations

  1. [S698] 1900-ME, Film T623-595, ED 146, p. 8A, Line 14.
  2. [S758] Cyrus Eaton, Thomaston-Rockland, p. 170.
  3. [S1041] 1860-ME, Film M653-443, pp. 70-71, Lines 38-40 & 1-2.
  4. [S1044] 1870-ME, Roll M593-548, p. 299.
  5. [S397] Charles Samuel Candage and Ruth Louis (Pitman) Candage, VR-Rockland, ME-1892, Marriages, 2:1165.
  6. [S846] 1880-ME, Film T9-482, ED 108, p. 107C.
  7. [S883] Arlene Clare (Perry) Lemire, AC(P)L.
  8. [S1122] 1910-ME, Film T625-542, p. 13B, ED 143, Line 72.
  9. [S981] Ancestry.com, 1880 Federal Census for Rockland, Knox, Maine, (Roll T9-482, p. 107C).

Lucinda B. Perry

F, b. 16 August 1883, d. November 1964
     Lucinda B. Perry was born on 16 August 1883 at Rockland, Maine.1,2 She was the daughter of Charles Woodart Perry and Georgie Etta Cables. Her married name was Peterson. Lucinda B. Perry appeared on the census of 1 June 1900 at Camden Street (Ward 1), Rockland, Maine.1 She died in November 1964 at Massachusetts at age 81.3 Lucinda married a Mr. Peterson.

Citations

  1. [S698] 1900-ME, Film T623-595, ED 146, p. 8A, Line 14.
  2. [S1070] Arlene Clare (Perry) Lemire, AC(P)L2006, (Family Group Sheet for Charles Woodart Perry).
  3. [S325] SSDI.

Agnes Mae Perry

F, b. August 1891
     Agnes Mae Perry was born in August 1891 at Rockland, Maine.1 She was the daughter of Charles Woodart Perry and Georgie Etta Cables. Agnes Mae Perry was also known as Aggie Perry. She married Franklin L. Radley on 18 December 1912 at Rockland, Maine.2 Her married name was Radley.

Child of Agnes Mae Perry and Franklin L. Radley

Citations

  1. [S698] 1900-ME, Film T623-595, ED 146, p. 8A, Line 14.
  2. [S672] MVR, (On-line Index - Agnes Perry & Franklin L. Radley).

Nathaniel Sowther

M, b. circa 1592, d. 27 June 1655
     Nathaniel Sowther was Secretary / Notary. LAST      Souther / Sowther
FIRST      Nathaniel

SPOUSE      Alice ______, she d.September 27, 1651 January 5, January 5, 1653 January 5, 1654 Sarah Hill (2nd),
widow of ______ Hill. (TR 9:44)

CHILDREN      Child of first marriage- Mary m1st 1653 Joseph Shaw, m2nd 1654 John Blake

DEED      June 5, 1652 Nathaniel Souther, lives in a house owned by James Everill. (SD 1:220). North St. between
Union St. and Creek. February 16, 1654 February 16, 1655 Nathaniel Souther, land of Souther, formerly of
Nathaniel Duncan, E. of Rev. John Wilson, and near William Franklin. (SD 2:140). Exchange St.

DIED      June 27, 1655

PROBATE      July 17, 1655 Nathaniel Sowther, adm to wife Sarah. (SPR 3:39). Inventory: 150.16.06

REFERENCE      first wife Alice ______ is / second wife Sarah Hill is / daughter Mary is / James Everill is / Nathaniel
Duncan is /

ABUTTERS      John Wilson is / William Franklin is /
REFCODE      55901.1 According to Glendon John Buscher, Jr. (21 Oct 1944) whom I met in Sep 1993 at the Massachusetts Archives; he told me that in the Town of Plymouth, near the airport, there is a Federal Furnace Road running south towards Carver and near there is one of the oldest roads in Plymouth, called "Souther Marsh Road". He said if I checked with the Plymouth Accessor's office, they may have some records to show me about it!

I checked out this road in Jul 2001 where I met William Bramhall Stearns III who owned the land. He was working in the Souther Cranberry bogs while I was there and took me for a walk along the old road. The area has now been turned into the Southers Marsh Golf Course.

****************************************

Derbyshire Family History Society
Bridge Chapel House, Saint Mary's Bridge
Sowter Road
Derby DE1 3AT
United Kingdom

****************************************

I don't remember where I got this:

Nathaniel Souther - 1646

From Aspinwall's Notarial Records, p. 22 it appears that Samuel Harvey, a mariner under Cromwell, made Nathaniel Souther, of New Plymouth, attorney to collect a debt owning by Andrew Hallet of Yarmouth. He was born circa 1588 at Derby, Derbyshire, England.2 He was born circa 1592 at Derby, Derbyshire, England.3 He was the son of Thomas Sowter. Nathaniel Sowther married first to Alice Devonport on 28 March 1613 at Derby, Derbyshire, England.4,3 [27(6)1649 old style] Mr. Sowther admitted to be a townsman. (TR 2:97).5 Nathaniel Sowther was freeman on 18 May 1653 at Plymouth, Plymouth Colony.6 He married Sarah Jurdain, daughter of Ignatius Jurdain and Elizabeth Baskerville, on 5 January 1653/54 at Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony.7,8,9,10 Nathaniel Sowther died on 27 June 1655 at Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony.11,12 His estate was probated on 31 July 1655 at Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony.12 It is believed that Nathaniel Sowther (as it was signed by him as Secretary of the Plimouth Colony under Governors Edward Winslow and William Bradford) arrived in Plymouth in 1635. That is the date that his name first appears in the records of the colony. Arriving in 1635 is based on the fact that he appears in the records of the colony shortly after Edward Winslow return from England. Although there is no formal order in the General Court pertaining to his admission as a Freeman, it is suspected that he may have been known by the Pilgrims before their emigration to America and that upon his arrival was made a Freeman by common consent.

On 2 Jan 1636, at the first session of the General Court held after his admission as a Freeman, which was three months after his presumed arrival, he was elected Secretary of the Colony. Edward Winslow was chosen Governor at the same election.

Prior to 1636, the records of the colony were maintained by Governor William Bradford. Nathaniel held this post from 3 Jan 1636 until July of 1646. Although not much is known about Nathaniel, it is implied by his position in the colony that he was well educated, perhaps in Law, that his religious beliefs were similar to those of the Pilgrims and that he belonged to a respectable English family.

Nathaniel's wife Alice and his two daughters, Hannah and Mary are believed to have come to America with him. All believed born in England since there are no notations of their birth in the colony.

Nathaniel is listed as a Freeman in the Boston City Register, Volume IV, p. 75 on 18 May 1653. On 19 Oct 1654, he deposed that his age was about 62 years, providing us with a birth of about 1592.

The following abstract of the earliest Suffolk County wills was taken from the NEHGR, 9:135. "The goods of Mr. Souther, Lately deceased, Aprized by Samuell Betfield, Thomas Bumsteed, Godfrey Armitage, 17 Jul 1655. Amt. £150.16.6. Goods of Mrs. Sowther, which she brought to Mr. Sowther, Amt. £83. Power of Administration granted to Sarah Souther, his widow, who deposed, 31 July 1655.

For a better understanding of Nathaniel Sowther and his family in England and New England, I have transcribed three articles from The American Genealogist, (TAG), 1966, 17:210-216 & 217-221; and 18:14-18. These articles provide as much information as may ever been known about Nathaniel Sowther.

Bancroft Addenda with Sowther and Gilbert Notes
by John G. Hunt, B.S.C., Arlington, Virginia

In 1961 Dr. George E. McCracken (TAG, supra, 37; 154-160) developed these facts concerning Bancrofts of early New England;
i. Thomas Bancroft, eminent poet, native of Swarkestone, Derbyshire, was alive at Bradley in that shire as late as 1658. His brothers were Ralph and John Bancroft, the latter of whom sold his land preparatory to removing to New England but died before 1639 prior to arriving in the New World; see evidence below.


ii. To be distinguished from the said John Bancroft, a certain John Bancroft, with wife Jane, was of Boston, Massachusetts in 1633; not known to have had any children, nor is there record in America of this couple after 1633.


iii. The Widow Bancroft of Lynn, Massachusetts, 1638, was likely in 1644 of Southampton, New York; there is no evidence that her name was Jane, as has sometimes been supposed, doubtless in confusion with Jane Barcroft, above. The widow possibly had daughters that married John Stratton and Thomas Talmage, Jr., two early settlers of Long Island.


iv. The said Widow Bancroft may have had sons John and Thomas Bancroft who were living in the Connecticut valley in the 1640's and 1650's; their sister seems to have been Anne or Hannah who married Sgt. John Griffin at Windsor, Connecticut, in 1647.


v. In records of Dedham, Massachusetts of the year 1647, appears the name of Thomas Bancroft, then aged about 22 years; although he later removed to Lynn, there is no good reason to think him akin to the Widow Bancroft. His name, however and that of his son Ralph, conform to the theory that he was somehow related to the aforesaid poet, Thomas Bancroft.


Much of the material that Dr. McCracken reviewed had been gathered some sixty years earlier by J. Henry Lea who summarized his findings in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 56:84-87, 196 f. Most curiously, however, Mr. Lea seems to have neglected to consult the will of John Bancroft of Kings Newton, in the parish of Melbourne, Derbyshire, dated 5 Jan 1634/5 and proved 12 May following by his relict Anne (PCC 55 Sadler). Asking to be buried in the parish church of Melburne, the testator left his goods to wife Anne for life, stipulating that she should divide equally between the children, with the elder son John getting the usual double share and the other six children one Bancroft-Sowther-Gilbert share each, they not named but two of the seven children are minor sons and perhaps not yet apprenticed. And if any things shall happen to be doubtful concerning my meaning. . . "or that my wyfe shall happen to remoue from the place where shee now dwelleth it is my mynd and will that my Ouerseers hereafter named or any two of them shall expound the said doubt and it shalbe at my said wiues pleasure to remoue and dwell wth my children where shee pleaseth pvided that shee do yt by the consent of my said ouseers or any two of them." As will be seen below, this implication of a possible moved elsewhere may be significant of plans laid before the final illness of the testator. Overseers were Henry Beighton of Ticknail, Nathaniel Sowther of Derby and John Ratcliffe of Kings Newton; witnesses were Nathaniel Sowther, Thomas Grimbold and Robte Draper [he by mark]. Sowther may have served as scrivener for the will, on which point see below.


As shown by Dr. McCracken, Mr. Lea made some wrong assumptions, the worst of which was that John Bancroft, the poet's brother, actually arrived in New England, dying soon afterwards. Both Meredith B. Colket, Jr. and Dr. McCracken reject this assumption, and with reason, for in memory of John Bancroft, his brother, are these words of the poet Thomas Bancroft, printed in 1639, and reprinted by John Nichols, History and Antiquities of the County of Leicester, (London 1804), vol. 3, pt. 2, p. *886 [sic, not 886]..


You sold your land, the lightlier hence to go
To foreign coasts; yet (Fates would have it so)
Did ne'er New England reach, but went with them
That journey towards New Jerusalem.


The question therefore now arises as to whether John Bancroft of Kings Newton, whose will we have abstracted, can have been brother to the poet, Thomas Bancroft. It must be noted that Kings Newton adjoins Swarkeston, the two being separated only by the River Trent. Moreover, the fact that the testator stipulated burial in the church seems to link him with the family of Bancroft long seated at Chellaston and Swarkeston, who in several wills abstracted by Mr. Lea, had also specified burial in their church, a privilege reserved for few persons. What seems much more meaningful, however, is the fact that Nathaniel Sowther of Derby, seemingly closest friend to the deceased John Bancroft, removed -almost immediately after Bancroft's death - to New England, where in 1636 he was given the position of Secretary to the colony of Plymouth. That Secretary Sowther of Plymouth was the Sowther of John Bancroft's will will be readily apparent from a comparison of the sign manual or cipher appended to his signature as witness to the Bancroft will with a similar signature to a 1653 deed of John and Martha Cogan of Boston where Sowther was then Notary Public. This deed is preserved in the Massachusetts Historical Society which kindly permits our reproduction of the part containing the signature.


[In an appendix hereto we add notes concerning Sowther].


Considering the foregoing facts, we are entitled to think it possible that Sowther, as closest friend to John Bancroft, may have carried the latter's family to the New World in 1636 or that he may have been the instrument who made possible their removal to New England around that time. We know from the poet that his elder brother, John, who lived in any case in the immediate neighborhood of Kings Newton, had died before 1639, having planned removal to New England. It seems rather likely that it was the John Bancroft of Swarkeston who sold his lands, say in 1633, and removed to the hamlet across the river, dying there at Kings Newton before he could complete his plans to migrate from England.


There are bits of evidence that conform to our reconstruction of the Bancroft story. In the first place, each of the three children attributed to the Widow Bancroft in Connecticut, had a daughter Anne or Hannah and a son Nathaniel. The girls' names easily could honor, the relict of John Bancroft of Kings Newton, their supposed grandmother, while the name Nathaniel could easily have been meant to honor Sowther, their supposed benefactor.


Significantly, also, it is to be noted that Thomas Talmage, Jr., of Long Island, in 1644 named one of his sons Nathaniel (a name not earlier found in this family). Moreover, Talmage had a daughter Hannah or Anna. His position as secretary or recorder at Easthampton, L.I., ties in nicely with that of Nathaniel Sowther, who was, if we are right, benefactor of Talmage's supposed wife's family (see Arthur White Talmage, Talmage Genealogy, [1909], pp. 23 f.).


In addition, we cite a Suffolk County, Massachusetts deed of 22d da. 9th mo. 1648 (Lib. 1, ff 96), which states:


Mr. Robt Saltonstall of Boston (granted) to Mr.
Nicholas Davison of Charlston his dwelling house
in Windsor uppon Connecticut formerly the possession
of ffrancis Stiles of Windsor, and now or late in
the occupation of Tho. Gilbert and John Banckraft.


That Gilbert and Bancroft occupied the same house could mean little, but when in Mr. Lea's cited paper we read of acquaintance between the Bancrofts of Chellaston and Swarkeston and the Gilberts of Barrow, which adjoins Swarkeston, we may commence to think that Bancroft of the Connecticut Valley in 1648 was quite possibly from the same part of England as Thomas Gilbert, and that their forefathers can have been acquainted. This, then, is a clue that the Connecticut valley Bancrofts and Gilberts may have come from Swarkeston or vicinity. Hand in glove with the foregoing facts is the comparable relationship that seems to have existed between Nathaniel Sowther and the Bancroft family on the one hand and between Elder William Brewster of Plymouth and Sowther, on the other.


It appears obvious that the ruling elder's influence may have accounted for the immediate appointment of Sowther, a newcomer, as Secretary of Plymouth Colony in 1636. For the elder's son Jonathan had in 1624 married Lucretia Oldham of Derby, who must have known Sowther in that city, where he plainly seems to have been a scrivener. Indeed, it is not at all farfetched to think that Lucretia may have been closely akin to Sowtherfor here mother seems to have been that Philippa Sowther (daughter of John), who was baptized in the parish of All Saints, Derby, 6 July 1568 in which parish she married 17 November 1588 William Ouldham known to have been the father of Lucretia, aforesaid (see New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 111:242 and the manuscript parish registers of All Saints, Derby).


At the time of Sowther's arrival at Plymouth in 1636, Jonathan Brewster was occupying an important trading post for Plymouth on the then remote Connecticut River; see George F. Willison, Saints and Strangers, 1945 edition, pp. 296, 302; p. 347 in paperback edition (1965), which is neither a reprint nor condensation of the 1945 but a revision of it, by the author himself.


It is not to be thought that Sowther's wife (whom he had married in 1613 at Derby) would have relished the continual shepherding of the Bancroft widow and her seven children, by her busy husband. So that even if Widow Bancroft came to Plymouth, where she has not been found recorded, it is likely that she may have removed not long afterwards. Connecticut was in 1636 too unstable for a widow with children; Lynn appears to have been first stopping place and when many of that town removed to Long Island before 1650, the widow Bancroft may well have gone with them, Connecticut still not being thought too secure. Yet it is likely that some of her children found homes along the River Connecticut, perhaps through the influence of Sowther and his kinsfolk, the Brewsters. The trade of young John Bancroft of Windsor, a ferryman, suggests the fondness that his supposed uncle, the poet Thomas Bancroft, had for the River Trent. We give this extract from the poet's words (Nichols, loc. cit.):


To Trent
Sweet River, on whose flowery margin laid
I with the slippery fish have often play'd
At fast and loose. . .


Bancroft descendants will perhaps wish to read what the poet said of his own parents "buried near together in Swarston church" (Nichols, ibid.):


Here lies a pair of peerless friends
Whose goodness (like a precious chain)
Adorn'd their souls in lives and ends;
Whom when Detraction's self would stain
She drops her tears instead of gall
And helps to mourn their funeral.


In tracing back the Sowther family at Derby, we find that John Sowter occurs 6 January 1498 in an extract from the court roll of the manor of Belper (Beau Repaire), Derbyshire, at Duffield, re 1 acre at Stanley (some five miles northeast of Derby - Derbyshire Charters, p. 37, no. 288). It was perhaps his son and namesake who served as churchwarden of the parish of All Saints, Derby, between 1535 and 1545 (History of the Parish of All Saints, Derby). About 1547 and again about 1554, John Sowter of Derby, plumber, and Agnes his wife, daughter of Thomas Fynymore, deceased, claimed property at Hanbury, Staffordshire, against Elizabeth Stafford and Alice her daughter, wife of John Greenwaye (Public Records Office, Lists and Indexes, 54:163; 55:95).


Perhaps a son of John and Agnes was that John Sowter whose children, baptized at All Saints, included:


Thomas Sowter, baptized April 1567, Philippa Sowter, baptized 6 July 1568, married at age 20 to William Ouldham (probably the man of that name buried at All Saints, Derby, 26 June 1636). Their daughter Lucretia, baptized 1600, married 1624 in New England (New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 111:242).


The aforesaid Thomas Sowter may well have been father of Nathaniel Sowther or Sowter of Derby, who deposed 19 October 1654 aged about 62 (Suffolk County, Massachusetts Deeds 2:85), so was born circa 1592. He married at St. Peter's, Derby, 28 March 1613, Alice Devonport. In 1634 Nathaniel Sowther was appointed overseer of the will of John Bancroft, signed the will as a witness (see above) and possibly was the scrivener who wrote out the text of the will. In 1653 he also signed as witness the Cogan deed and there are clear resemblances at least in some words between the handwriting of the Bancroft will and the Cogan deed and whatever differences are visible may obviously be the result of the natural changes in the handwriting of any man in a period of nineteen years or the conditions surrounding the production of the document.


For the subsequent history of Nathaniel Sowther in New England, see the fine article by Mrs. John E. Barclay which follows immediately. Now, however, there remains to be presented additional information tending to show the connection between Connecticut Gilberts and the part of Old England whence came, supposedly, our Connecticut Bancrofts.


Thomas Gilbert, named above as at Windsor, Connecticut in 1648, had sons Jonathan and Josiah who were styled kinsmen by the Widow Katharine (relict of John) Harrison of Wethersfield, Connecticut, at the time of her extended trial as a witch (Homer W. Brainard, Harold S. Gilbert and Clarence A. Torrey, The Gilbert Family, (1954), 5 f.; Henry R. Stiles, History of Wethersfield, Connecticut, 1:276, 2:416). During the trial she testified in 1670 that she had been in Connecticut nineteen years, coming directly from England (R. E. Dale, Boston Evening Transcript, 11 July 1934).


Earlier in the proceedings against Widow Harrison, Elizabeth, wife of Simon Smith of Thirty Miles Island testified in 1668 that "Katharine was . . . one that told fortunes . . . and also would oft speak and boast of her great familiarity with Mr. Lilly, one that told fortunes and foretold many matters that in future times were to be accomplished" (John M. Taylor, The Witchcraft Dulusion in Colonial Connecticut, (New York, 1908), p. 56. In responding to the accusation, the widow cited as witnesses, among others, both Jonathan and Josiah Gilbert - it seems clear that she was related to them.


Who was the Mr. Lilly named by the widow's accuser? According to the Dictionary of National Biography, William Lilly (1602-1681), noted astrologer and fortune teller was born at Diseworth, Leics. In 1620, when 18 years of age, after being educated in a school at Ashby de la Zouch near Diseworth, he removed to London where his chequered career brought him into correspondence with the King of Sweden and friendship with Elias Ashmole, the famed antiquarian and astrologer.


We doubt that Katharine, widow Harrison, personally knew Mr. Lilly; her first daughter Rebecca was born at Wethersfield in 1654 and it would seem that Katharine herself was not born much before 1624, if that early; yet we think it quite possible that either her husband or her kinfolk had known Lilly as a youth before Lilly left his native shire. Diseworth, his birthplace, lies about six miles from Barrow on Trent, adjoining Swarkeston, which could very well be the parish where the Gilberts of Windsor, Hartford and Wethersfield originated. Two men named John Harrison were testators in the early 1600's, both of Bredon (close to both Barrow and Diseworth (see British Record Society, Index to Leicestershire Wills, Vols. 27, 51).


Too, it must be recalled that Thomas Bancroft of Swarkeston, father of the poet, in his will in 1626, named as overseer his neighbor, Roger Gilbert of Barrow, where the Gilberts had long flourished (see New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 56: 84-87; The Genealogist, n.s., 7:138-140). The original will of Elizabeth Gilbert, spinster, late of Barrow, dated 20 March 1614 (nuncupative), now in the Public Library, Lichfield, Staffordshire, tells us that her grandsire was William Gilbert, father of her uncle Roger Gilbert whose children she named as John, Elizabeth, Francis, William, Sarah and Anne. There is even a remote chance that the latter, Anne, may have been the wife of John Bancroft who died a resident of Melbourne. Note also that Thomas Gilbert married Anne Ward, 26 June 1611, at Swarkeston.


Editor's Note: We are happy to print Mr. Hunt's interesting speculation concerning the Bancroft origin. The newly discovered will is important and the onomastic arguments and chronology fit nicely, but it is a bit strange that the Widow Bancroft shows up fi[rst at Lynn and not at Plymouth wit the Sowthers].


Nathaniel Sowther, Secretary of Plymouth Colony

by Mrs. John E. Barclay, F.A.S.G., Whitman, Massachusetts


For an account of Nathaniel Sowther's English origin see Mr. Hunt's article immediately preceding (supra, 214 f.), which was prepared quite independently of my own study, though we have had the advantage of seeing each other's work when completed.


Nathaniel Sowther is first mentioned in Plymouth Colony in a list of freeman, he being admitted on 4 October 1636 and that same day he was named on the jury (Plymouth Colony Court Orders 1:4 and 44). The date of his arrival in this country is unknown but he may have come with Edward Winslow, who had gone back to England in 1635 as agent for the Colony, returning the latter part of the year. At the first session of the General Court after he became freeman, Mr. Nathaniel Sowther was made secretary of Plymouth Colony on 3 January 1636/7 and Edward Winslow, Governor 1:48). Until this date the Governor had also acted as secretary-treasurer. Mr. Sowther must have been highly respected and well known to some of the colonists.


On 7 January 1640/1 (ibid, 1:170) a list of the clerk's fees was agreed upon by the Court of Assistants and on 1 March 1641/2 (2:34), his salary was made 20 pounds per annum besides his fees. He was first granted land, 6 February 1636/7, 6 acres in Plymouth where William Richards dwelt; 5 February 1637/8, 4 acres more at Woeberry Playne; 2 November 1640, 10 acres of meadow by Jones River and from time to time several other small parcels, but 7 March 1642/3 he was granted "a farme land of 200 acres of upland with meadow to it in some convenient place." This latter will be referred to later.


In 1643 he was among those able to bear arms, age 16-60 and was named "clark of the company or band." About the time of his arrival in this country there was considerable complaint about the condition of the laws and a committee was chosen to revise them. Still not satisfied nine years later on 4 June 1645, another committee was chosen "to revise the existing laws, correct the abuses, etc.", and this time Nathaniel Sowther was a member. It is believed due to his influence that the whole body of the laws was rewritten in so thorough a manner.


The Colony records from 3 January 1636/7 to 7 July 1646 are in Mr. Sowther's handwriting and he always wrote his name "Sowther", never as "Souther'. There are numerous records during these years wherein he served in various capacities. On 2 March 1640/1 the Court appointed Mr. Edward Winslow and Mr. Sowther to draw up a conveyance or surrender for the lands within the patent ungranted, for Mr. Bradford to surrender into the hands of the whole body of freeman. (ibid. 2:9).


Just how long Mr. Sowther remained in Plymouth Colony is not certain; probably until about two years after date of his last records, for we find that he was "admitted an inhabitant" of Boston 27 June 1649 (Boston Commissioners' Report, Doc. #46, p. 97). He was made a freeman there 18 May 1653 and was appointed "public Notary for this jurisdiction in the room of Mr. William Aspinwall" (Massachusetts Bay Colony, 4:1:18).


Nathaniel Sowther was born in England about 1592 according to his own deposition 19 October 1654 that he was "aged about 62" (Suffolk Deeds, 2:85). He died at Boston, Massachusetts, 27 April 1655 (Boston Comm. Rep. Doc., #130, p. 51). He married, first, at St. Peter's, Derby, 28 March 1613, Alice Devonport, who died at Boston, 27 July 1651 (ibid. p. 34); second, at Boston, 5 November 1653, Sarah Hill, widow, (ibid. p. 44). She was a daughter of Ignatius Jurdain of Exeter, Devon, and married first William Hill; second, Nathaniel Sowther; and third, Edmund Greenleaf. The story of the interesting research which led to the identification of this woman will be reserved until our next issue.


Administration of Sowther's estate was granted to his widow 31 July 1655 and on 12 July 1655 the appraisal amounted to £50, s. 16, d. 6 and the goods Mrs. Sowther brought to him at £83.


In Suffolk Deeds 2:232 Sarah Sowther of Boston, widow, administratrix of the estate of Nathaniel Sowther, her late husband deceased and Nathaniel Duncan of Boston, merchant, sold for £5 to Joseph Rocke of Boston, merchant, "all that messuage tenement or dwelling Howse in which the said Sarah Sowther doth now inhabit and dwell with a yard thereunto belonging, house front next the street towards the east and backward lying next to Mr. John Wilson, pastor on the west part one side lying next the house of Godfrey Armitage on the south part the other side lying next the land of William Toy on the north part with all . . . appurtenances . . . which aforesaid Nathaniel Duncan purchase of William Franklin. . . that they said Sarah Sowther and Nathaniel Duncan are lawfully seized of and . . . in their own right and to their own use of a good estate and are true and proper owners thereof and hath full power to sell . . . and shall deliver to the said Rocke all deeds, writings, etc., remaining in their hands (22 February 1655, signed by both and acknowledged save day that his wife Elizabeth Duncan gave her consent, recorded 15 March 1655).


The explanation of the preceding deed will be given in the next issue. No deeds of Nathaniel Sowther have been found in Boston.


Children: all by first wife


1. i. Hannah, b. circa 1619
2. ii. Mary, b. circa 1625, d. Boston, 7 January 1693
iii. Sarah, baptized All Saints, Derby, 7 December 1626; no trace in America


1. Hannah Sowther (Nathaniel) was born circa 1619 but no record of her death has been found. She married, first, at Plymouth, 28 Sept. 1641, Mr. William1 Hanbury (Plymouth Col. Ct Or. 2:23). There seems to be evidence that he was born at Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, 17 April 1614, son of John Hanbury who died 28 April 1636 and "Mrs. Hanbury" who died in 1650; and that he had a sister Rachel, born 19 June 1606, and a brother John, born 2 July 1609, all of which seems to be borne out by references to his family in his will (Suffolk Prob. 3:258-9 new series). He died at Boston, Feb. 1649. He is first mentioned in Plymouth Colony when he bought house and land of Mr. John Brown at Jones River, 15 July 1640 (Plym. Col. Deeds 1:99); bought house and land of Mr. John Done, 19 Feb. 1645 (ibid. 1:218). The Brown lands he farmed out to Francis Goole, 21 Nov. 1644, but owing to neglect he had to reclaim it from him through the courts. He sold this property to Christopher Winter, 27 Oct. 1647. He was admitted freeman, 6 March 1642; the Winter deed is the last reference to him at Plymouth. He and his father-in-law probably moved to Boston during the next year, but Mr. Hanbury only loved about a year after his arrival in Boston. A son was born only a few days before he made a nuncupative will, 13 Feb. 1648/9. He left all to his wife "knowing that she would take care of their children," and depositions were made by Comfort Starr, Isaac Walker, and Mary Sowther (his sister-in-law). The widow was named administratrix and the inventory taken 21 (12m) 1649 amounted to as much as £1453/01/08. It is in the estate papers that we learn there were four childen not named and other pertinent data: "1 dwelling and shop; farm at Jones River in question betwixt me and my brother John Hanbury of £100; also £100 which will be, at old Mrs. Hanbury's decease in England, which I take not for present; out of which estate I intend to give 2/3 debts being paid) to my four children of what will be gott in with respect to the eldest according to his birth right and to the rest as I shall think good and the the remainder I reserve to myself. There is an account between my sister Stroute of London wherein I may be indebted to her £30 or thereabouts." All these data agree with the records from Wolverhampton but further proof should be sought. Of the four children, only one birth has come to light, and a deed names a daughter. All but the latter had died before 1699, probably in childhood.


The widow Hannah (Sowther) Hanbury married, second, as second wife, at Boston 24 (8m) 1656, Francis1 Johnson (Boston Comm, Rep. Doc. #130, p. 57). He was born about 1609, died March 1690/1, aged 82. They had no issue. Administration of his estate (Suffolk Prob. 8:157) was granted 19 march 1690/1 to his daughter by his first wife, Elizabeth McCarty, and her husband Thaddeus. There is no evidence that Hannah was then living.


Children: surname Hanbury


i. Hannah2, b. ca. 1642, probably at Jones River (Kingston); d. 26 Feb. 1710/11, widow at Boston (Sewall Diary); m., as second wife, John2 Wiswall, son of Elder John of First Church of Boston, by whom she had four children recorded at Boston, all of who probably died young except the son John3 Wiswall, b. 21 March 1667/8, who was living in 1691 but whereabout unknown to his father (Middlesex Court Rec.). They resided in Chelsea and Boston. Record of John2's death was not found nor probate but he was living 7 July 1704 when he quitclaimed to Elisha Cooke land formerly Captain Keayne's in Chelsea. Proof that John2 Wiswall married Hannah2 Hanbury will be found in Suffolk Deeds 21:167, dated 19 Jan. 1699; "John Wiswall and Hannah, his wife, the only surviving daughter and heir apparent of William Hanbury late of Boston shopkeeper deceased . . . all that messuage . . . situate near the head of a certain dock" (Bendall's). Unless John3 Wiswall married and had issue, of whom we know nothing, Nathaniel Sowther left no descendants.


ii. Child, b. ca. 1644, probably at Jones River.
iii.Child, b. ca. 1644, probably at Jones River.
iv. William, bapt. Boston, 11 (12m) 1648, being 6 days old; d. 1 Feb. 1650.


2. Mary2 Sowther (Nathaniel1) was born in England, ca. 1625 and died at Boston, 7 Jan. 1693. She married first, as second wife, 1 (10m) 1653 at Boston, Joseph2 Shaw, mariner, bapt. 14 March 1618 at Northowram, Halifax, England, son of Abraham Shaw of Dedham and Weymoth, Mass. and he died twelve days after their marriage. The name of his first wife is unknown but by her he had three children: Joseph, John, Fearnot; none by Mary Sowther. His widow received one-half of his estate by his will (Suffolk Prob. 1:97). She married, second, at Boston, 16 Aug. 1654, John2 Blake, bapt. Pitminster, England, 30 Aug. 1618, son of William and Agnes Blake of Dorchester, Mass; died at Boston, 25 Jan. 1688/9. They had but one child, Hannah Blake, born 16 Jan. 1657, d. 30 Aug 1659. His will (Suffolk Prob. #1678) to his wife 200 pounds, use and improvement of all his estate, if she continue his widow, and he made generous bequests to his brothers and other relatives and his nephew John Blake inherited the bulk of his real estate.


Two more records in Plymouth Colony Court Orders are of interest: 3:182, 7 March 1659/60: "in answeare to the request of Mr. John Blake of Boston in behalfe of himselfe and sister Mistris Hannah Johnson, that according to a former graunt of the Court unto Mr. Nathaniel Souther [sic] their father deceased, that hee the said Blake might have liberties to looke out a pcell of land to accomodate them according to the aforesaid graunt, the Court gave him libertie to seeke out land in case hee can find any land yett undesposed of within our jurisdiction that may bee suitable unto him and answerable to his expectation, hee is to signify it to the court, and shall have a competencye thereof confeirmed unto them." Likewise, 4:74; 4 Oct. 1664, "James Lovell of Waymouth producing a deed of sale from the heirs of Mr. Nathaniel Souther [sic] for a sertaine tract of land long since graunted by this collonie to Mr. Souther and alsoe propounding a place where hee desired to take up neare the place where Pheneas Prat and sonnes of Clement Briggs were accomodated between their land and the line of the patent, this Court taking notice of the former graunt, doe accordingly allow . . ."


. . . . . .


Within a year or two after the death of Nathaniel Sowther, a Joseph and John Souther appear in Boston but it seems clear from the above data that they could not have been his sons but may have been related.



Sarah (Jurdain) [Hill] [Sowther] Greenleaf

By Mrs. John E. Barclay, F.A.S.G., Whitman, Mass.


Since completion of the article on Nathaniel Sowther which appeared in our previous issue (TAG, supra, 42:217-221), the parentage of his second wife, Widow Sarah Hill, has come to light in a roundabout way. Nathaniel died intestate in Boston, Mass., 27 June 1655. An inventory of his estate was taken, 17 Jul 1655 and Sarah was administratrix. The estate was valued at £109.19.06, but of this "£83 was for goods Mrs. Sowther brought to Mr. Sowther. . . ". Three item that were listed are of particular interest: a silver bowl, a silver porringer and a silver spoon, for these will be mentioned in a memo attached to another estate and will help to identify her.


After Nathaniel died, Sarah, as administratrix, and Nathaniel Duncan, merchant of Boston, on 22 Feb. 1655/6 sold to Joseph Rocke "all that messuage tenement or dwelling house in which Sarah Sowther doth now inhabit. . .which the aforesaid Nathaniel Duncan purchased of William Franklin. . .that they are true and proper owners" (Suffolk Deed 2:232). His wife Elizabeth gave consent. No conveyance of this property to Nathaniel Duncan, Nathaniel Sowther nor to Sarah as Widow Hill could be found. The deed evidently neer was recorded but later we shall show that Sarah and Elizabeth, wife of Nathaniel Duncan, were probably sisters. Sarah may have been living with the Duncans after the death of her first husband and at the time she married Nathaniel Sowther, 5 (11m) 1653. It is not clear whether Sarah as Widow Hill bought a share of the house of Nathaniel Duncan or Nathaniel Sowther purchased sit of him after he married her. It is certain that when Mary Hudson, widow of Ralph, died 26 Sept. 1651, Nathaniel Duncan occupied as tenant one of the houses which she bequeathed to ger grand-daughter Hannah Leverett. Therefore, the Franklin property was not bought until after that date.


Sarah Sowther, as such, disappears from the records but probably iss the Mrs. Sowther mentioned in Mrs. Martha Cogan's estate in 1660, widow of Mr. John Cogan of Boston. Looking for possible relationship, we turned to Mr. McCracken's study of early Cogans (New England Hist. and Gen. Reg., 111:12-15). There we find that the witnesses to John Cogan's will, dated 3 Aug. 1658 were: Nathaniel Duncan, Thomas Bumstead, Henry Powning, Ignatius Hill and Samuel Robinson. Among references cited were Water's Genealogical Gleanings in England, 2:1072, will of Elizabeth Jurdain, widow, of Exeter, Devon, dated 27 Sept. 1633, proved 31 Oct. 1633: "I give all that debt which Nathaniel Duncan oweth me unto his two sons Peter and Nathaniel; I release and discharge William Hill my kinsman of all debts due me . . ." Note that this testatrix does not specify what the relationship was, nor does she name her deceased husband, and Waters did not find a will which can be identified as that of her husband, thogh she alludes to his will in hers. She names as her children only Elizabeth, Susanna, John, Sarah, Lydia and Ruth, no son Ignatius, and as at least some of the children are minors and unmarried, she was more probably of the same generation, rather than of the preceding, as the testator of the next will, Ignatius Jurdain of Exeter, dated 1 march 1635, proved 16 Oct. 1640 (ibid., 2:1073), who names wife Elizabeth, and "children of my son Nathaniel Duncan 100 pounds . . . children of my son William Hill 100 pounds," among other bequests. it is obvious that the will of Elilzabeth Jurdain first cited above cannot be that of the wife of this Ignatius, since she was a widow in 1633 and he was still living in 1635 and probably until not long before probation of his will on 16 Oct. 1640. The will of his widow, also named Elizabeth, was probably but not quite certainly the one dated 20 June 1645, proved 9 March 1649 (ibid., 2:1074) who, though she says her husband was named Ignatius, yet mentions a son Ignatius, whereas the testator of 1635 named a son Joseph, but not a son Ignatius. We can suggest a way in which this seeming discrepancy could be eliminated. There was an Ignatius Jurdain, in 1625 admitted to Wadham College, Oxford, and instituted Vicar of Cranham, Essex, 2 Sept. 1639, and if he was a son of Ignatius (the testator of 1635) by his wife Elizabeth [she was a Baskerville, as shown by the will of her brother Sir Simon Baskerville, Doctor in Physic, whose will is also absstracted by Waters (ibid.) the Clergyman might well have been omitted in his father's will as having received his portion in support at the University. Elizabeth the testatrix of 1645 had also a grandchild Joseph Hill, who may have been an unknown child of William Hill by Sarah Jurdain.


Another important will, not cited by Mr. McCracken but necessary to complete this article will be found in Waters (1:70): the will of Mary Godwyn, widow, of Lyme Regis, co. Dorset, dated March 1665, proved 6 June 1665: "to my three cousins William, James and Ignatius, sons of my brother William Hill in New England 150 pounds equally between them," among other bequests. In a footnote (p. 71) Waters states that the widow of William Hill and mother of William, James and Ignatius, became the wife of Mr. Edmund Greenleaf.


From the above it is evident that Nathaniel Duncan and William Hill married before 1635 daughters of Ignatius Jurdain who died about 1640, although these daughters are not mentioned in his will. According to Marriages in the Exeter Diocese, p. 54, Nathaniel Duncan of Exeter, merchant, married Elizabeth Jurdain of the same place, 3 Jan. 1616/7. There is no record now extant of the marriage of Edmund Greenleaf to Sarah, widow of William Hill, but it has been taken for granted that he was her second husband. Proof will be given that he was her third.


John Cogan, Nathaniel Duncan and William Hill, with their wives and children, probably were among the passengers on the unknown ship that arrived in 1633. Settling first in Dorchester where all three men received grants, Cogan, we learn, had settled permanently in Boston by 1634; and the Joseph Rocke mentioned in Suffolk Deed 2:232 was his son-in-law. Duncan and Hill took a prominent part in the Dorchester Town affairs. Nathaniel Duncan's sons, Nathaniel and Peter, are mentioned in the records; he removed to Boston about 1646 where he died in 1668/9 (Suffolk Probate 5:114). We know he had a wife Elizabeth at the date of the deed of 23 Feb. 1655/6, presumably the one he married in Exeter.


William Hill sold all his grants by 1638 and removed to Windsor, Conn., later to Fairfield where he died in 1649, leaving a wife Sarah by whom he had William, Sarah, Joseph, Ignatius, Elilzabeth and James. According to Donald Lines Jacobus, Families of Old Fairfield, 1:278, William Hill was son of James Hill of Lyme Regis, Dorset (Waters, op. cit., 1:70) and married 28 Oct. 1619 at St. Mary Arches, Exeter, Devon, Sarah Jurdain, baptized there March 1598/9. The son William remained in Fairfield; Ignatius was of Boston and Barbadoes and died probably unmarried near 12 Jan. 1675, date of inventory of his estate (Suffolk Probate 5:315), brother James administrator. James himself married at Boston, 10 April 1662, Hannah Henchman, and had four children recorded there. He died there on 26 Feb. 1720/1 (Ancient and Honorable Artillery, p. 248). For further details on the Hill family see Families of Old Fairfield.


Sarah Jurdain must be the Sarah Hill, widow, who married, second, at Boston, 5 (11) 1653, Nathaniel Sowther, as his second wife, and as previously said, he died 27 (4) 1655. If she is the Mrs. Sowther mentioned in Mrs. Crogan's estate, she was still a widow in 1660 but the widow Sowther. She certainly did marry Edmund1 Greenleaf of Newbury and Boston but as her third husband, probably soon after his first wife died, 18 Jan. 1662/3. From reading his will with the memo (Suffolk Probate 7:112) and the inventory, we gather that this was not a happy marriage. She receives no bequest, although she was probably still living but possibly elsewhere with one of her children. In the memo attached to the will, he laments:


When I married my wife I kept her Grand Child as I best remember 3 years to Scooling, Dyet & apparell & William Hill her son had a bond of Six pound a yeare wereof I Received no more than a barrell of porke 3t:6-0 of that 6-0-0 a yere he was to pay mee & I Sent to her Son Ignatius Hill to the Barbados in Mackrell Sider & bred & pease as much as come to twenty pound I never received one penny of itt; his Aunt gave to the three Brothers £50 apiece. I Know whether they received it or not but I have not received any pt of it Beside when I maried my wife She brought mee A silver bowle a silver porringer a silver spon She sent or gave them to her son James Hill without my consent.


Thus it is evident that Sarah (Jurdain) [Hill] Sowther brought to her third husband, Edmund Greenleaf, the the same three piees of silver which she brought to Nathaniel Sowther, her second husband. Taking all these things into consideration, there can be no doubt of her identity. No record of her death was found but we gather from the wording of Edmund Greenleaf's inventory she was still living on 19 (2m) 1671. "What our Mother Greenleaf had of ye goods" is followed by a list of household goods, also butter, meat and fish. She probably had died by 1 Feb. 1673/4 when her son William Hill, Jr. entered for record at Fairfield lands of which half were his portion and the rest granted him by his father-in-law [step-father] Greenleaf and his mother. She had no issue by her last two husbands, of course.


[Note: In my article on Mr. John Cogan of Boston (New England Hist. and Gen. Reg., 111:10-16) to which Mrs. Barclay has alluded above, I discussed the difficult problem of the identies of this John Cogan's wives. I then pointed out that he left a widow who had been previously been the widow of Thomas Coytmore and was born Martha Rainsborowe, that earlier he had had a wife named Mary who died 14 Jan. 1651/2; that still earlier he may have had a wife named Anne, but that "the first wife" often attributed to him, i.e. Abigail, was not his at all. On 7 Aug. 1639 Mr. John COGAN appointed Thomas Lechford the task of preparing a pwoer of attorney [Lechford's Note-Book, p. 97; New England Hist. and Gen. Reg. 40:270] naming one Nicholas Carwithye, Citizen and Grocer, of Exeter, to receive a debt of £66 owed Cogan by Ignatius Jordan [sic], alderman, of Exeter, and also any possible legacy from Jordan's estate to himself, his wife, or his children. When I read this note of Lechford, I concluded that it was probable that one of the wives of John Cogan, either Anne, if she was his wife, or Mary, was a daughterof Ignatius Jordan, but as I soon discovered, the Cogans were not named in the will of Jordan who was, of course, identical with the Ignatius Jurdain cited by Mrs. Barclay above. Now that I know that this Ignatius Jurdain omitted from his will the names of his daughters Sarah and Elizabeth, as well as his son Ignatius, it seems less rash to suppose that he was the father of that wife of John Cogan who was mother of at least some of the older children. John Cogan had daughters named Mary (wife of John Woody and Thomas Robinson), Elizabeth (wife of Joseph Rocke), Anna/Hannah, Lydia, and Sarah [she was at least daughter of Martha Rainsborrow and bother in 1657, long after the death of Ignatius Jurdain. John Cogan named daughters with the same names borne by Mrs. Hill and Mrs. Duncan, and Lydia is the name of a daughter of one Elizabeth Jurdain cited by Mrs. Barclay. If this surmise is right, then the descendants of Mr. John Cogan may also lay claim to ancestry from Ignatius Jurdain and his wife Elizabeth Baskerville.


There remains one point to be mentioned. The will of Ignatius Jurdain, though dated 1 March 1635, was not probated until 16 Oct. 1640, and it was supposed by both Mrs. Barclay and by me that he died in 1640. There is a bit of evidence to show that he was already dead by 7 Aug. 1639, the date of the power attorney designed to receive legacies, if any, from his will. It would seem probable that Jurdain died early enough for the news to have reached Boston before 7 Aug. 1639. An estate as complex as his is likely to have been would take a long time to settle.


George E. McCracken


*******************************************

"In 1652 the town of Pequot (now New London) enlarging itself to Pawcatuck gave William Chesebrough legal title to a large tract of land (between two and three thousand acres). Meantime Massachusetts laid claim to the settlement and after controversy the territory east of the Mystic River was awarded to Massachusetts under the name of "Southertown". In 1662 it again became part of the Colony of Connecticut. In 1665 it was named Mystic but in 1666 in was re-named Stonington.

_____________________________

I don't remember where I got this:

Nathaniel Souther - 1646

From Aspinwall's Notarial Records, p. 22 it appears that Samuel Harvey, a mariner under Cromwell, made Nathaniel Souther, of New Plymouth, attorney to collect a debt owning by Andrew Hallet of Yarmouth.

____________________

William (Cheesbrough) Chesebrough, Thomas Stanton, Walter Palmer, and Thomas (Minor) Miner were the first settlers of European descent in Stonington , New London County, Connecticut (originally Southertown, Suffolk County, Massachusetts) beginning in the year 1649.

In order to "set the stage" for these great pioneers of strong character and high purpose of laying the foundations of a well-ordered, civil and religious community, we have included excerpts from the History of the Town of Stonington, County of New London, Connecticut, from its First Settlement in 1649 to 1900 by Richard Anson Wheeler, published by the Press of the Day Publishing Company, New London, Connecticut, 1900 and the Genealogy of the Descendants of William Chesebrough of Boston, Rehoboth, Mass., by Anna Chesebrough Wildey, published by the Press of T. A. Wright, New York, New York, 1903.

The original land area of Stonington was included in the first patent of Connecticut by Robert, Earl of Warwick in 1631. However, the colony of Massachusetts having furnished men and munitions of war for the conquest of the Pequot Indians in 1637, claimed an interest by right of conquest and was determined to occupy it in advance of any settlement on the part of Connecticut. The General Court of Massachusetts named it Southertown and annexed it to the county of Suffolk. Southertown remained a township of Massachusetts until the issue of the Charter of Connecticut by King Charles II, dated April 25, 1662, which fixed the eastern boundary of Connecticut at the Pawcatuck River, thereupon this territory which for three and a half years had been subject to the control of Massachusetts, reverted back to the sister Colony.

In 1665, the name Southertown was changed to Mystic and in the following year to Stonington.

Children of Nathaniel Sowther and Alice Devonport

Citations

  1. [S919] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants & Estates et al.
  2. [S548] Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, IGI, Derby, England.
  3. [S181] John G., B.S.C. Hunt, Bancroft Addenda, p. 215.
  4. [S130] Melinde Lutz Sanborn, Torrey-Supplement, p. 56.
  5. [S919] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants & Estates et al, Reference Code 55878.
  6. [S381] Lucius R. Paige, MA Freeman, with an Index by Elizabeth Petty Bentley, p. 22.
  7. [S50] NEHGR, Volume X, p. 224.
  8. [S182] Mrs. John E. Barclay, Nathaniel Sowther, p. 218.
  9. [S183] Mrs. John E. Barclay, Sarah Greenleaf.
  10. [S248] William S. Appleton, RC-B, Bt, M & D, p. 44.
  11. [S248] William S. Appleton, RC-B, Bt, M & D, p. 51.
  12. [S209] Charles Henry Pope, Pioneers-MA, p. 426.

Alice Devonport

F, b. circa 1590, d. 27 September 1651
     Alice Devonport was born circa 1590 at London, co. Middlesex, England. Alice Devonport was also known as Alice Dawport. She married Nathaniel Sowther, son of Thomas Sowter, on 28 March 1613 at Derby, Derbyshire, England.1,2 Her married name was Sowther. Alice Devonport died on 27 September 1651 at Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony.3,4,5

Children of Alice Devonport and Nathaniel Sowther

Citations

  1. [S130] Melinde Lutz Sanborn, Torrey-Supplement, p. 56.
  2. [S181] John G., B.S.C. Hunt, Bancroft Addenda, p. 215.
  3. [S50] NEHGR, Volume X, p. 71.
  4. [S182] Mrs. John E. Barclay, Nathaniel Sowther, p. 218 &.
  5. [S209] Charles Henry Pope, Pioneers-MA, p. 426.

Hannah Sowther

F, b. circa 1619, d. after 1659
     Hannah Sowther was born circa 1619 at Derby, Derbyshire, England.1 She was the daughter of Nathaniel Sowther and Alice Devonport. Hannah Sowther married William Hanbury, son of John Hanbury, on 28 September 1641 at Plymouth, Massachusetts.2,3 Hannah Sowther married William Hanbury, son of John Hanbury, on 28 September 1641 at Plymouth, Devon, England. Her married name was Hanbury. Hannah Sowther married Francis Johnson on 24 October 1656 at Boston, Massachusetts.4,5,6 Her married name was Johnson. Hannah Sowther died after 1659.

Children of Hannah Sowther and William Hanbury

Citations

  1. [S182] Mrs. John E. Barclay, Nathaniel Sowther, p. 219.
  2. [S182] Mrs. John E. Barclay, Nathaniel Sowther, p. 219 &.
  3. [S213] Lee D. van Antwerp and Ruth Wilder Sherman, VR-Plymouth-1850, p. 654.
  4. [S129] Clarence Almon Torrey, Torrey, p. 420.
  5. [S182] Mrs. John E. Barclay, Nathaniel Sowther, p. 220 &.
  6. [S209] Charles Henry Pope, Pioneers-MA, p. 210.

Mary Sowther

F, b. circa 1625, d. 7 January 1693
     Mary Sowther was born circa 1625 at Derby, Derbyshire, England.1 She was the daughter of Nathaniel Sowther and Alice Devonport. Mary Sowther married John Blake, son of William Blake and Agnes ( ? ) Band, on 1 August 1653 at Boston, Massachusetts.2 Mary Sowther married first to Joseph Shaw, son of Abraham Shaw and Bridget Best, on 1 December 1653 at Boston, Massachusetts.3,4,5 Her married name was Shaw. Mary Sowther married second to John Blake, son of William Blake and Agnes ( ? ) Band, on 16 August 1654 at Boston, Massachusetts.6,7,8 Her married name was Blake. Mary Sowther died on 7 January 1693 at Boston, Massachusetts.1

Children of Mary Sowther and Joseph Shaw

Child of Mary Sowther and John Blake

Citations

  1. [S182] Mrs. John E. Barclay, Nathaniel Sowther, p. 219.
  2. [S281] Melinde Lutz Sanborn, Torrey 2, p. 57.
  3. [S129] Clarence Almon Torrey, Torrey, p. 665.
  4. [S248] William S. Appleton, RC-B, Bt, M & D, p. 44.
  5. [S182] Mrs. John E. Barclay, Nathaniel Sowther, p. 220.
  6. [S12] Francis Everett Blake, Increase Blake, p. 21.
  7. [S129] Clarence Almon Torrey, Torrey, p. 75.
  8. [S182] Mrs. John E. Barclay, Nathaniel Sowther, p. 221.

Sarah Jurdain

F, b. circa 1599, d. 1705
      (an unknown value). Sarah Jurdain was born circa 1599. She was the daughter of Ignatius Jurdain and Elizabeth Baskerville. Sarah Jurdain married first to William Hill on 28 October 1619. Her married name was Hill. Sarah Jurdain married second to Nathaniel Sowther, son of Thomas Sowter, on 5 January 1653/54 at Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1,2,3,4 Her married name was Sowther. Sarah Jurdain married third to Edmund Greenleaf after 1663 at Newbury, Massachusetts Bay Colony.5,6 Her married name was Greenleaf. Sarah Jurdain died in 1705.7,8 She was buried at Kings Chapel Burial Ground, Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony.9 Sarah is buried in Kings Chapel Burial Ground. Her stone has not been located.9

Citations

  1. [S50] NEHGR, Volume X, p. 224.
  2. [S182] Mrs. John E. Barclay, Nathaniel Sowther, p. 218.
  3. [S183] Mrs. John E. Barclay, Sarah Greenleaf.
  4. [S248] William S. Appleton, RC-B, Bt, M & D, p. 44.
  5. [S129] Clarence Almon Torrey, Torrey, p. 372.
  6. [S137] Sandra MacLean Clunies, SMC, FGS.
  7. [S183] Mrs. John E. Barclay, Sarah Greenleaf, p. 204.
  8. [S919] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants & Estates et al.
  9. [S919] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants & Estates et al, Reference Code 55902.

George H. Cables

M, b. 14 December 1823, d. 4 April 1891
     George H. Cables was Following is a paper written in 1983 by Joan Edith (Radley) Mays.

Captain George H. Cables
b. Dec. 14, 1822, Augusta, Maine
d.
m. Nancy H. Grant, April 3, 1850 (Dr. Stephen Prescott, grandfather of Nancy Grant - in Bible)
b. Oct. 13, 1835, Rockland, Maine
d. April 4, 1891

Children: all born in Rockland, Maine
     David Franklin b. Aug. 3, 1853/4     m.               d.
     Clara Weeks b. Dec. 6, 1855/6     m.               d.
     *Georgie Etta b. Oct. 24, 1857/8     m. Chs. Perry      d. 2/21/22
     Stephen Hatch b. Jan. 10, 1860      m.               d.

Brothers of Geo. Cables were Capt. John F., Charles H. and George H. They came from Cohasset, Mass. to Rockland, Me. John Cables married Priscilla E. Grant, sister of Nancy.

Captain Cables was appointed acting master of the U.S. Sloop, St. Louis Feb. 1862. He served in the Union in the Civil War (my grandmother Radley showed me a picture of Capt. Cables, a very nice looking man with a full beard. Cannot locate the picture used to be kept in family bible) I have the two bibles that belonged to Georgie E. Perry. Joan Edith Radley Mays) 1983

Georgie Etta Cables Perry was very active in the Littlefield Memorial Baptist Church, Rockland, Me. She raised money to renovate the church by selling calendars. The church is still there. She took her religion seriously and was true to it all of her adult life. She divorced Charles W. Perry when he took to drinking excessivly and earned her own living by practical nursing and was a great demand according to my grandmother Agnes May Perry Radley (her daughter). Georgie Etta died on the island of Vinal Haven of peritonitis. My grandmother told of having to go by boat and to cut the ice in the Rockland breakwater in order to get to her in time before she died. My grandmother made it in time to see her mother alive and told of her reciting the 23rd Psalm before she died and how her feet were getting numb and when it got to her heart she would be gone. She had eaten a combination of foods known to upset her and paid with her life: peanuts, bananas and clams. Georgie had a history of problems with her bowel - I suspect she suffered from a form of diverticulitis.

*Georgie Etta Cables
b. October 24, 1857/8 Rockland, Maine
d. Feb. 21, 1922 Vinal Haven Buried in the Seaview Cemetary, Rockland, Me.
m. Charles W. Perry Rockland, Me. 4/5/1876 Rev. J. Killoch performed the ceremony at home. Rockland Courier Gazette
Divorced after 19 yrs.
b. Jan. 5, 1855
d. March 31, 1906, Boston, Mass.
(owned property and ice houses in Chickawaukee Pond)

Children: all born in Rockland, Maine
**Woodward Augustus Perry b. Apr. 4, 1875     m. Edith Dow d. 1926
Lucinda B. Perry Peterson
Agnes May Perry Radley
**Edith Dow Perry (diabetic)
b. May 13, 1875 Warren, Me.
d. Oct. 14, 1946 Quincy, Ma. buried Mt. Wollaston Cemetary, Quincy, Ma.

Children:
1. Edwin L. Perry, b. 2/14/03 m. Clara Gillis d. 6/1/64 2 children
2. Ruth Agnes Perry, b. 8/26/07 m. H. Roy Souther d. 3/9/75 5 children
3. Georgette E. Perry, b. 4/06/10 m. Raymond Johnson d. No children.



He was Acting Master / Master Mariner. He was born on 14 December 1823 at Augusta, Maine.1,2,3 He was the son of Henry Charles Cables and Martha Grant. George H. Cables was also known as Captain George H. Cables. Marriage banns for George H. Cables and Nancy H. Grant were published on 2 January 1850 at Cohasset, Massachusetts.2 George H. Cables married Nancy H. Grant, daughter of David Grant and Priscilla Eames, on 3 April 1850 at East Thomaston, Maine.1,2,4 George H. Cables married Nancy H. Grant, daughter of David Grant and Priscilla Eames, on 4 April 1850 at Rockland, Maine.5 George H. Cables appeared on the census of 16 June 1860 at Rockland, Maine.6 He appeared on the census of 29 June 1870 at Rockland, Maine.7 He married Louisa M. Morse on 27 January 1873 at Rockland, Maine. George H. Cables appeared on the census of 1890 at Veterans Census, Rockland, Maine; [Acting Master - USN, Enlisted 18 Dec 1861 to 6 Mar 1866, 5 years, 3 months of service].8 He died on 4 April 1891 at Rockland, Maine, at age 67.9 He was obituary on 7 April 1891 at ?, Rockland, Maine. He was buried at Ash Point Cemetery, Owl's Head (Ash Point), Maine.10 "Captain Cables was appointed Acting Master of the U.S. Sloop Saint Louis on February 1862. He served in the Union in the Civil War. "My Grandmother Radley showed me a picture of Captain Cables, a very nice looking man with a full beard. I can't locate the picture. It used to be kept in the family bible. I have the two bibles that belonged to George E. Perry". Joan Edith (Radley), May. 198?"11 George and his entire family can be found in the 1870 Federal Census for Maine, residing in Rockland, with an estate value of $1,200. and a personal value of $300. and occupation of Master Mariner.

He was also found in an 1885 Rockland City Directory as residing at 38 North Main Street in Rockland and still listed as a Master Mariner.

He and his wife are buried in the Ash Point Cemetery at Owl's Head,Maine. He was described on 6 September 2011 at 76087701.

Children of George H. Cables and Nancy H. Grant

Citations

  1. [S758] Cyrus Eaton, Thomaston-Rockland, p. 170.
  2. [S2] George Lyman & Elizabeth Osgood Davenport, Cohasset-Genealogies, p. 103.
  3. [S560] E-Mail, from Donald Cables, dated 30 Jan 2006, <e-mail address> (from Tombstone at Ash Point Cemetery).
  4. [S883] Arlene Clare (Perry) Lemire, AC(P)L, (Dr. Stephen Prescott, grandfather of Nancy Grant - in Bible).
  5. [S397] Charles Samuel Candage and Ruth Louis (Pitman) Candage, VR-Rockland, ME-1892, 1:222 & 875.
  6. [S1041] 1860-ME, Film M653-443, pp. 70-71, Lines 38-40 & 1-2.
  7. [S1044] 1870-ME, Roll M593-548, p. 149.
  8. [S981] Ancestry.com, "Maine 1890 Veterans Census" for Rockland, Knox, Maine, ED 203, p. 2.
  9. [S397] Charles Samuel Candage and Ruth Louis (Pitman) Candage, VR-Rockland, ME-1892, 1:2041.
  10. [S560] E-Mail, from Donald Cables, 3 Jan 2001,. <e-mail address>
  11. [S883] Arlene Clare (Perry) Lemire, AC(P)L.

Nancy H. Grant

F, b. 13 October 1835, d. 7 March 1871
     Nancy H. Grant was born in 1833 at of, East Thomaston, Maine.1 She was born on 13 October 1835 at Rockland, Maine.2 She was the daughter of David Grant and Priscilla Eames. Marriage banns for Nancy H. Grant and George H. Cables were published on 2 January 1850 at Cohasset, Massachusetts.1 Nancy H. Grant married George H. Cables, son of Henry Charles Cables and Martha Grant, on 3 April 1850 at East Thomaston, Maine.3,1,4 Nancy H. Grant married George H. Cables, son of Henry Charles Cables and Martha Grant, on 4 April 1850 at Rockland, Maine.5 Her married name was Cables. Nancy H. Grant appeared on the census of 16 June 1860 at Rockland, Maine.6 She appeared on the census of 29 June 1870 at Rockland, Maine.7 She died on 7 March 1871 at Rockland, Maine, at age 35.8 She died on 4 April 1891 at age 55.2 She was buried at Ash Point Cemetery, Owl's Head (Ash Point), Maine.9 She was described on 7 September 2011 at 76151512.

Children of Nancy H. Grant and George H. Cables

Citations

  1. [S2] George Lyman & Elizabeth Osgood Davenport, Cohasset-Genealogies, p. 103.
  2. [S883] Arlene Clare (Perry) Lemire, AC(P)L.
  3. [S758] Cyrus Eaton, Thomaston-Rockland, p. 170.
  4. [S883] Arlene Clare (Perry) Lemire, AC(P)L, (Dr. Stephen Prescott, grandfather of Nancy Grant - in Bible).
  5. [S397] Charles Samuel Candage and Ruth Louis (Pitman) Candage, VR-Rockland, ME-1892, 1:222 & 875.
  6. [S1041] 1860-ME, Film M653-443, pp. 70-71, Lines 38-40 & 1-2.
  7. [S1044] 1870-ME, Roll M593-548, p. 299.
  8. [S222] Frances Lawrence, FL, ltr, dtd 19 Feb 1994.
  9. [S560] E-Mail, from Donald Cables, 3 Jan 2001,. <e-mail address>

David Franklin Cables

M, b. 3 August 1853, d. 19 December 1905
     David Franklin Cables was Seaman. He was born on 3 August 1853 at Rockland, Maine.1,2 He was the son of George H. Cables and Nancy H. Grant. In 1882-1885 David was listed as residing at 38 Main Street in Rockland, Maine. He was a Seaman. David Franklin Cables appeared on the census of 16 June 1860 at Rockland, Maine.3 He appeared on the census of 1870 at Rockland, Maine.4 He died on 19 December 1905 at Rockland, Maine, at age 52.5 He was obituary David Cables died at his home on Birch Street Tuesday. He was born in Rockland Aug. 3, 1851. He was the son of the late George Cables. He was loved and highly respected by all who knew him. His last few weeks were weeks of intense suffering. He had always been a kind and affectionate husband and father. He is survived by a wife, three children, Clara Ingerson, Albert Cables and Laura Barter, two sisters, Mrs. Clara Donell of Lynn, Mass. and Mrs. Georgia Perry of this city, and one brother, Stephen Cables, and many other relatives and friends who mourn their loss. Rev. W.W. Carver of the Littlefield Memorial Church officiated. The flowers were many and beautiful. on 23 December 1905 at Courier-Gazette, Rockland, Maine. David's 23 Dec 1905 obituary from the Courier-Gazette of Rockland, Maine
David Cables died at his home on Birch Street Tuesday. He was born in Rockland Aug. 3, 1851. He was the son of the late George Cables. He was loved and highly respected by all who knew him. His last few weeks were weeks of intense suffering. He had always been a kind and affectionate husband and father. He is survived by a wife, three children, Clara Ingerson, Albert Cables and Laura Barter, two sisters, Mrs. Clara Donell of Lynn, Mass. and Mrs. Georgia Perry of this city, and one brother, Stephen Cables, and many other relatives and friends who mourn their loss. Rev. W.W. Carver of the Littlefield Memorial Church officiated. The flowers were many and beautiful.

Citations

  1. [S758] Cyrus Eaton, Thomaston-Rockland, p. 170.
  2. [S883] Arlene Clare (Perry) Lemire, AC(P)L.
  3. [S1041] 1860-ME, Film M653-443, pp. 70-71, Lines 38-40 & 1-2.
  4. [S981] Ancestry.com, 1870 Federal Census for Rockland, Knox, Maine, (Roll M593-548, p. 299).
  5. [S981] Ancestry.com.

Clara Weeks Cables

F, b. 6 December 1856
     Clara Weeks Cables was born on 3 March 1855 at Rockland, Maine.1 She was born on 6 December 1856 at Rockland, Maine.2,3 She was the daughter of George H. Cables and Nancy H. Grant. Clara Weeks Cables appeared on the census of 16 June 1860 at Rockland, Maine.4 She appeared on the census of 1870 at Rockland, Maine.5 She married Herbert Melville Donnell on 10 June 1878.6 Her married name was Donnell. As late as 1882, Clara was found listed as working as a Tailoress and boarding with her brother David at 38 North Main Street in Rockland, Maine.

Citations

  1. [S222] Frances Lawrence, FL, ltr dtd 14 Feb 1994.
  2. [S758] Cyrus Eaton, Thomaston-Rockland, p. 170.
  3. [S883] Arlene Clare (Perry) Lemire, AC(P)L.
  4. [S1041] 1860-ME, Film M653-443, pp. 70-71, Lines 38-40 & 1-2.
  5. [S981] Ancestry.com, 1870 Federal Census for Rockland, Knox, Maine, (Roll M593-548, p. 299).
  6. [S981] Ancestry.com.

Stephen Hatch Cables

M, b. 10 January 1860
     Stephen Hatch Cables was born on 10 January 1860 at Rockland, Maine.1,2 He was the son of George H. Cables and Nancy H. Grant. Stephen Hatch Cables appeared on the census of 1870 at Rockland, Maine.3 He appeared on the census of 1920 at Rockland, Maine.4 Stephen was found enumerated in the 1920 Federal Census for Maine, residing in Rockland with his wife, Lauret ? and son Stephen Hatch Cables, Jr.4

Citations

  1. [S222] Frances Lawrence, FL, ltr dtd 14 Feb 1994 & IGI, 1994 Edition, Version 3.05.
  2. [S883] Arlene Clare (Perry) Lemire, AC(P)L.
  3. [S981] Ancestry.com, 1870 Federal Census for Rockland, Knox, Maine, (Roll M593-548, p. 299).
  4. [S944] 1920-ME, ancestry.com, Rockland, Knox, ME, E.D. 71.

Nathaniel Alford Dow

M, b. April 1852
     Nathaniel Alford Dow was Carpenter. He was born in 1851 at Warren, Maine.1 He was born circa 1852 at Rockport, Maine. He was born in April 1852 at Warren, Maine.2 He was the son of Joseph G. Dow and Eliza M. Merry. Nathaniel Alford Dow was baptized in April 1852 at Warren, Maine.3 He was born in April 1854 at Maine.4 Nathaniel Alford Dow was also known as Alford Dow. Nathaniel Alford Dow was also known as Alfred Dow. He appeared on the census of 25 June 1860 at Warren, Maine; [listed as Alford].1 He appeared on the census of 6 June 1870 at Washington, Maine.5 He married Clara E. Spear, daughter of Charles M. Spear and Rebecca Carriel, on 21 August 1872 at Knox County, Maine.6 Nathaniel Alford Dow married Clara E. Spear, daughter of Charles M. Spear and Rebecca Carriel, on 29 August 1872 at Warren, Maine.2,3,4 Nathaniel Alford Dow appeared on the census of 1880 at Warren, Maine.7 He appeared on the census of 2 July 1900 at Mill Street, Rockport, Maine; [listed as Alford].4 He appeared on the census of 1920 at Rockport, Maine.8 He died at Warren, Maine. The birth certificate of his daughter, Mary Edna, lists the father's name as Nathaniel A. Dow although he was always refered to as "Alford".

He has been found in census and other records online as N. Alford Dow and Alford Dow.

He was a Carpenter of Rockport.

Children of Nathaniel Alford Dow and Clara E. Spear

Citations

  1. [S1041] 1860-ME, Film M653-443, Line 36.
  2. [S838] Cyrus Eaton, Warren, ME, p. 536.
  3. [S31] Robert Piercy Dow, Dow, p. 633.
  4. [S698] 1900-ME, Roll T623-595, ED 152, p. 21A, Lines 46-49.
  5. [S1044] 1870-ME, p. 17, Line 4.
  6. [S560] E-Mail, from Sena Havasy, dated 16 Jul 2004, <e-mail address>
    Quoting: "Maine State Archives, Marriage Records, Roll #2, Volume 1, pg. 227, Spear, Clara E. - Spouse: Dow, Alfred; Marriage Date : 21 Aug 1872, County: Knox, Residence : Rockland, Spouse's Residence : Rockland.
  7. [S846] 1880-ME, National Archives Film #T9-0483, p. 323C.
  8. [S944] 1920-ME, ancestry.com, Rockport, Knox, ME, E.D. 76, p. 978, Line 115.